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for instance:

l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]]

and the result I'm looking for is

r=[[1,4,7],[2,5,8],[3,6,9]]

and not

r=[(1,4,7),(2,5,8),(3,6,9)]

Much appreciated

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4 Answers 4

up vote 57 down vote accepted

How about

map(list, zip(*l))
--> [[1, 4, 7], [2, 5, 8], [3, 6, 9]]

?

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15  
Beware: if l is not evenly sized (say, some rows are shorter than others), zip will not compensate for it and instead chop away rows from the output. So l=[[1,2],[3,4],[5]] gives you [[1,3,5]]. –  badp Sep 13 '13 at 12:12

One way to do it is with the numpy transpose.

>>> numpy.asarray(l).T.tolist()
[[1, 4, 7], [2, 5, 8], [3, 6, 9]]

Or another one without zip:

>>> map(list,map(None,*l))
[[1, 4, 7], [2, 5, 8], [3, 6, 9]]
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1  
Love your second one -- I didn't realize map could do that. Here's a slight refinement that doesn't require 2 calls, though: map(lambda *a: list(a), *l) –  Lee D Nov 8 '13 at 11:51
2  
Shouldnt this be a better answer as it takes care of uneven lists? –  Leon Jun 1 at 17:34

Equivalently to Jena's solution:

>>> l=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]]
>>> [list(i) for i in zip(*l)]
... [[1, 4, 7], [2, 5, 8], [3, 6, 9]]
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just for fun

>>> [[j[i] for j in l] for i in range(len(l))]
[[1, 4, 7], [2, 5, 8], [3, 6, 9]]
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this is what I was looking for and couldn't get my head around. Still @jena's solution is really short –  titus Jun 24 '11 at 21:12
2  
Yeah, it took a few tires to get this right. Okay, many tries. –  matchew Jun 25 '11 at 4:07
2  
Still isn't quite right -- this only happens to work when the dimensions are square! It should be: [[j[i] for j in l] for i in range(len(l[0]))]. Of course, you have to be sure that list l is not empty. –  Lee D May 27 '13 at 19:41
    
@LeeD still doesn't work for me on jena's example l=[[1,2],[3,4],[5]] –  hobs Oct 4 '13 at 22:24
2  
@hobs That was badp's example, responding to jena. However, I'm not sure it makes sense to me. IMO, transposition implies a rectangular matrix -- when represented as a list of lists, that means all the internal lists must be the same length. What result would you want as the "transposition" of this example? –  Lee D Nov 8 '13 at 11:30

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