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This is a simple design decision that seems to have significant passions on each side. I am struggling to really understand which design has the least negative consequences.

I have a method to add a banana:

public Banana AddBanana(string name) 
{
    // add the banana
    var _Banana = new Banana { Name = name };
    this.Bananas.Add(_Banana);
    return _Banana;
}

But in some cases I cannot add a banana, something like this:

public Banana AddBanana(string name) 
{
    // test the request
    if (this.Bananas.Count > 5)
        return null;
    if (this.Bananas.Where(x => x.Name == name).Any())
        return null;
    // add the banana
    var _Banana = new Banana { Name = name };
    this.Bananas.Add(_Banana);
    return _Banana;
}

Now I want to communicate back to the caller WHY they can't.

WHICH way is the better approach?

Approach 1: communicate with an exception

public Banana AddBanana(string name) 
{
    // test the request
    if (this.Bananas.Count > 5)
        throw new Exception("Already 5 Bananas");
    if (this.Bananas.Where(x => x.Name == name).Any())
        throw new Exception("Banana Already in List");
    // add the banana
    var _Banana = new Banana { Name = name };
    this.Bananas.Add(_Banana);
    return _Banana;
}

Approach 2: communicate with a test

public Class CanAddBananaResult 
{
    public bool Allowed { get; set; }
    public string Message { get; set; }
}

public CanAddBananaResult CanAddBanana(string name) 
{
    // test the request
    if (this.Bananas.Count > 5)
        return new CanAddBananaResult { 
            Allowed = false, 
            Message = "Already 5 Bananas" 
        };
    if (this.Bananas.Where(x => x.Name == name).Any())
        return new CanAddBananaResult { 
            Allowed = false, 
            Message = "Banana Already in List" 
        };
    return new CanAddBananaResult { Allowed = true };
}

public Banana AddBanana(string name) 
{
    // test the request
    if (!CanAddBanana(name).Allowed)
        throw new Exception("Cannot Add Banana");
    // add the banana
    var _Banana = new Banana { Name = name };
    this.Bananas.Add(_Banana);
    return _Banana;
}

In Approach 1, the consumer knows the problem based on the exception.Message.

In Approach 2, the consumer can prevent the exception rather than catch it.

Which approach is better overall?

I read this: Design classes so that an exception is never thrown in normal use. For example, a FileStream class exposes another way of determining whether the end of the file has been reached. This avoids the exception that is thrown if you read past the end of the file. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/seyhszts(v=vs.71).aspx

But the "exceptional" approach seems to be less code. Does that mean simpler/better?

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1  
is not being able to add a banana an exceptional case or can it occur during normal operation? –  BrokenGlass Jun 24 '11 at 21:36
    
It's not exceptional, look at the tests. Duplicate and Limit. Nothing too exceptional about it. "Exceptions are for exceptional situations" is a popular phrase, but what's the real decision point here? –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT Jun 24 '11 at 21:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should use both.

If it is possible to determine before the method is called whether or not it will be successful, then using a Can() method (or property if the conditions for failure are not specific to the method arguments) is appropriate and useful. There are numerous examples in the framework: TypeConverter.CanConvertFrom/To immediately comes to mind.

However, you cannot guarantee that a caller will use the method you provide to them before calling your method. So you still need to throw appropriate exceptions if the method is called incorrectly (TypeConverter.ConvertFrom will throw under the same conditions that TypeConverter.CanConvertFrom will return false).

share|improve this answer
    
What if Can() is expensive? –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT Jun 24 '11 at 22:14
    
You can still implement it, and leave it up to the caller to decide if the cost is worth it. A caller may be able to change control flow or UI if a given method is unavailable, so being able to determine whether it is available or not can still be useful. Obviously that is highly dependent on the context; if you want to post more details of your specific situation, I can give you a more detailed answer. –  David Nelson Jun 27 '11 at 18:19
    
I agree with your answer; it's also the design we chose. –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT Jun 27 '11 at 22:24
    
Agree, I've seen a lot of standard libraries that use this approach. They provide methods to query the state of the object or collection, and then throw an exception if manipulating or adding to the object fails. –  Ogre Psalm33 Apr 1 '12 at 2:11

The second approach seems unnecessarily complex, so I tend to prefer the first one.

To give the caller the opportunity to perform the checks himself, I'd add the following members:

public bool IsFull
{
    get { return this.Bananas.Count > 5; }
}

public bool ContainsBanana(string name)
{
    return this.Bananas.Any(b => b.Name == name);
}

I'd probably also return the existing banana if the name already exists:

public Banana GetOrAddBanana(string name) 
{
    var banana = this.Bananas.FirstOrDefault(b => b.Name == name);
    if (banana == null)
    {
        if (this.IsFull) throw new Exception("Collection is full");
        banana = new Banana { Name = name };
        this.Bananas.Add(banana);
    }
    return banana;
}

If not being able to add a banana is not an exceptional case, but can occur during normal operation, I'd use the Try... pattern:

public bool TryGetOrAddBanana(string name, out Banana banana) 
{
    banana = this.Bananas.FirstOrDefault(b => b.Name == name);
    if (banana == null)
    {
        if (this.IsFull) return false;
        banana = new Banana { Name = name };
        this.Bananas.Add(banana);
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your approach is cumbersome if the number of tests like IsFull / ContainsBanana is a super long list OR if it could change over time. It's also just more coding for the consumer than a single Can() method to test. Simpler API seems friendlier to your consumers; less likely to be errors. –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT Jun 24 '11 at 21:55
    
@Jerry Nixon: Your question is difficult to answer. You seem to have a very elaborate use case in mind that's not reflected by your simplified example. I gave an answer how I'd design your simplified example, not your specific use case. The only general answer I can give is: It depends. It depends on how your class is used, who uses it, how it evolves, how expensive the checks are, what the caller can do when an operation fails, performance requirements, etc. Analyse your use case and pick the solution that best fits what you need. –  dtb Jun 24 '11 at 22:27
    
thank you. I'm just looking for talking points to help in the decision-making process. There's bound to be an overarching rule somewhere. –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT Jun 24 '11 at 22:39
    
@Jerry, re:"There's bound to be an overarching rule somewhere." This is a common misconception when it comes to design decisions; the concept of "best practices" is overused. It is likely that there is NO overarching rule, and that the "best" approach is highly dependent on the specific circumstances, as well as your design goals. –  David Nelson Jun 27 '11 at 18:26
    
I would suggest that could equally be a common misconception that there are no overarching rules or best practices. I think there are. Not in everything, but I look for them anyway. –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT Jun 28 '11 at 21:48

I'd say it depends on the situation.

If the consumers of your class know what to do when a banana can't be added, or if not being able to add bananas is a regular occurrence, use the second option.

If, on the other hand, the "can't add banana" handling logic is several layers up the call chain, or if not being able to handle bananas is rare (only happening in the case of a network outage, logic error, disk error, and so on), then rely more heavily on exception -- that's what they're for!

share|improve this answer
    
I think you must assume consumers NEVER know. Today's development team might know. But tomorrow's maintenence developer probably won't. –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT Jun 24 '11 at 22:40

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