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class Collator<S extends Stream<E extends Comparable<E>>> {
    S s;
    E e;

    public <S> Collator(List<S> streams){
        s = streams.get(0);
        e = s.read();
    }

    public <E> E next(){
        return e;
    }
}

interface Stream<E extends Comparable<E>>{
    public E read();
}

class Record implements Comparable<Record>{
    public Integer time;

    public int compareTo(Record r){
        return this.time.compareTo(r.time);
    }
}

Especially 1st line:

  class Collator<S extends Stream<E extends Comparable<E>>>

I expect to say:

Define a collator that works on Streams of Entries where each Entry implements comparable.

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Compile and run it. Does it work? –  tsm Jun 24 '11 at 21:45
    
Did it compile? –  Marcelo Jun 24 '11 at 21:45
    
No. Obviously it did not. that is why I posted it here. But i dont know why –  ajay Jun 24 '11 at 21:46
    
what was the error? –  Richard J. Ross III Jun 24 '11 at 21:50
    
If it didn't compile, don't you think the error message will obviously help us help you. –  Marcelo Jun 24 '11 at 21:53
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

you miss-qualified the generic parameters

class Collator<S extends Stream<E>,E extends Comparable<E>> {
    S s;
    E e;

    public Collator(List<S> streams){
        s = streams.get(0);
        e = s.read();
    }

    public E next(){
        return e;
    }
}

interface Stream<E extends Comparable<E>>{
    public E read();
}

class Record implements Comparable<Record>{
    public Integer time;

    public int compareTo(Record r){
        return this.time.compareTo(r.time);
    }
}

this compiles

in particular the line class Collator<S extends Stream<E>,E extends Comparable<E>> it means a Collator that works on a S that is a Stream of E and E implement Comparable

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This is the way to do it, I just had the wrong? impression that E should go before S in the generic definition, I.E. E extends Comparable<E>, S extends Stream<E> instead of S extends Stream<E>, E extends Comparable<E> –  Marcelo Jun 24 '11 at 22:01
1  
@marcelo the order doesn't matter just that all used types are defined (either outside the generic definition as any other type or as one of the parameters) how else would a circular generic type be able to be defined class CircularGeneric<B extends Back<F>,F extends Forth<B>> –  ratchet freak Jun 24 '11 at 22:19
    
Nice to know, good answer. –  Marcelo Jun 24 '11 at 22:21
    
thank you very much! I would never guessed such a solution –  ajay Jun 24 '11 at 23:44
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Some glass ball guessing, since you don't show your error message:

Your constructor and method are declaring new type parameters <E> and <S> which are shadowing the type parameters of your class. Remove them.

Then, E should be a type parameter of your class, too.

class Collator<E extends Comparable<E>, S extends Stream<E>> {
    S s;
    E e;

    public Collator(List<S> streams){
        s = streams.get(0);
        e = s.read();
    }

    public E next(){
        return e;
    }
}

interface Stream<E extends Comparable<E>>{
    public E read();
}

class Record implements Comparable<Record>{
    public Integer time;

    public int compareTo(Record r){
        return this.time.compareTo(r.time);
    }
}
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add comment

The problem is E extends Comparable

Define a collator that works on Streams of Entries where each Entry implements comparable of a given type:

public class Collator<T,E extends Comparable<T>, S extends Stream<E>> 
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