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Is it possible to define a generic type in C# that references itself?

E.g. I want to define a Dictionary<> that holds its type as TValue (for a hierarchy).

Dictionary<string, Dictionary<string, Dictionary<string, [...]>>>
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No, this is not possible. Could you be more specific at what you are trying to achieve? – Darin Dimitrov Mar 15 '09 at 9:22
    
lol Earwicker, you gotta agree it is weird ;) ... I also thought it didn't (directly) .. – eglasius Mar 15 '09 at 9:31
    
I think people get confused because a class cannot inherit from itself (obviously, or it would have infinite size as soon as it had any fields), nor can a generic inherit from a type parameter, but the class's own name and type parameters may appear in the type arguments of a generic base just fine. – Daniel Earwicker Mar 15 '09 at 9:37
up vote 34 down vote accepted

Try:

class StringToDictionary : Dictionary<string, StringToDictionary> { }

Then you can write:

var stuff = new StringToDictionary
        {
            { "Fruit", new StringToDictionary
                {
                    { "Apple", null },
                    { "Banana", null },
                    { "Lemon", new StringToDictionary { { "Sharp", null } } }
                }
            },
        };

General principle for recursion: find some way to give a name to the recursive pattern, so it can refer to itself by name.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 very nice, that actually compiles/runs – eglasius Mar 15 '09 at 9:27
    
thanks! good that Dictionary isn't sealed :) – laktak Mar 16 '09 at 11:50
3  
lambda calculus for the win! – data Nov 14 '10 at 13:38

Another example would be generic tree

public class Tree<T> where T : Tree<T>
{
    public T Parent { get; private set; }
    public List<T> Children { get; private set; }
    public Tree(T parent)
    {
        this.Parent = parent;
        this.Children = new List<T>();
        if(parent!=null) { parent.Children.Add(this); }
    }
    public bool IsRoot { get { return Parent == null; } }
    public bool IsLeaf { get { return Children.Count==0; } }
}

Now to use it

public class CoordSys : Tree<CoordSys>
{
    CoordSys() : base(null) { }
    CoordSys(CoordSys parent) : base(parent) { }
    public double LocalDistance { get; set; }
    public double GlobalDistance { get { return IsRoot?LocalDistance:Parent.GlobalDistance+LocalDistance; } }
    public static CoordSys NewRootCoordinate() { return new CoordSys(); }
    public CoordSys NewChildCoordinate()
    {
        return new CoordSys(this);
    }
}

static void Main() 
{
    // Make a coordinate tree:
    //
    //                  +--[C:50] 
    // [A:0]---[B:100]--+         
    //                  +--[D:80] 
    //

    var A=CoordSys.NewRootCoordinate();
    var B=A.NewChildCoordinate(100);
    var C=B.NewChildCoordinate(50);
    var D=B.NewChildCoordinate(80);

    Debug.WriteLine(C.GlobalDistance); // 100+50 = 150
    Debug.WriteLine(D.GlobalDistance); // 100+80 = 180
}
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