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My webpage has a header image that always remains at the top of the window. When the window is maximised the header image is centred, but when viewing in a small window (or a smart-phone browser) the header is set to the left of the window, and the right side cropped. Because the header div is wider than the page content, the horizontal scroll-bar appears when the window is smaller than the header, not the page.

I would like the header image to be centered on the page at all times, with both left and right sides being cropped if the window is smaller than header. Also the horizontal scroll-bar to only be turned on if window width is less than page width.

This image might explain it more clearly:

image http://postimage.org/image/49ne3k3o/

My code so far:

CSS:

#headerwrap {
    position: relative;
    width: 998px;
    height: 100px;
    margin: 0 auto;
    pointer-events: none;
}
#header{
    position: fixed;
    top: 0;
    width: 998px;
    margin: 0;
    background: url('../images/top.png') no-repeat;
    height:100px;
    z-index: 1;
    pointer-events: none;
}

and HTML implementation:

<div id="headerwrap"\>
<div id="header">
</div>
</div>

(the page is 690px wide, the header is 998px)

Any help would be much appreciated.

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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to set left: 50% on the header element that has position: fixed, and then apply a negative margin of half that element's width to center it.

#header {
  height: 100px;
  width: 998px;
  position: fixed;
  top: 0;
  left: 50%;
  margin-left: -499px;
  background: url('../images/top.png') no-repeat;
}

Here's a quick fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/blineberry/w8P2S/

You don't really need a wrapper for this.

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The relatively positioned wrapper is contributing to the horizontal scrollbars when it is wider than the browser. Remove it and adjust the padding for the following elements to account for the fixed positioned header being "out of flow." –  Brent Jun 25 '11 at 2:43
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You do need the negative margin-left, like Brent says, but that margin will vary depending on the user's browser resolution, and could be a problem if the user resizes the browser.

To figure out that margin I've used a simple jquery method that works like a charm everytime:

jQuery(window).resize(function() {
  var width = jQuery(document).width();
  var margin = (yourImageWidth-width)/-2;
  jQuery('.yourCssClassForYourHeader').css('margin-left', (margin)+'px');
});

This function must be called on document ready for the first time, and then it gets called everytime the browser is resized by the user.

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Would it be acceptable for the the header to shrink to fit the window? Also, do you need this to be a pure HTML / CSS solution?

edit:

Here's a little script I just wrote that will resize both divs to the size of the browser window. It doesn't require any libraries (like jQuery).

<script type="text/javascript">
var clientWidth = document.documentElement.clientWidth;

document.getElementById('headerwrap').style.width = clientWidth + "px";
document.getElementById('header').style.width = clientWidth + "px";
</script>

Or if you want a gap at both sides you could do something like:

var padding = 50;
document.getElementById('header').style.width = (clientWidth - (padding * 2)) + "px";
document.getElementById('header').style.left = padding + "px";

So ya, in summary:

<script type="text/javascript">    
    var clientWidth = document.documentElement.clientWidth;
    document.getElementById('headerwrap').style.width = clientWidth + "px";

    var padding = 50;
    document.getElementById('header').style.width = (clientWidth - (padding * 2)) + "px";
    document.getElementById('header').style.left = padding + "px";
</script>

Also, change the wrapper to position: absolute; top: 0px and the inner div to position: absolute; top: 0px;

Hope this helps!

Also, you have a forward slash in your wrapper div that needs to go :)
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Pure HTML and CSS would be nice but it's not essential. If shrinking the header will work then that's fine, how would I go about implementing it? –  James Jun 25 '11 at 2:34
    
k just a sec.. I'm writing something up for ya –  Inversus Jun 25 '11 at 2:38
    
Just change the value of padding to set the gap at both sides (which will always be even at both sides regardless of the size of the browser window) –  Inversus Jun 25 '11 at 3:25
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Another option would be to remove the background property from the #header div and put it in the #headerwrap like so:

EDIT:

I added comments to help explain the effects of the changes to css.

EDIT @Brent's answer:

Brent's answer is also good, but it does bring up an issue of where the contents position themselves. http://jsfiddle.net/MarbleStrain/FdL44/ Notice how the Test div is invisible if the window isn't big enough. I don't want to dis Brent's answer or anything as his answer is equally valid depending on which flow you are wanting. I just want to point out the difference between the two results.

#headerwrap {
    background: url('../images/top.png') no-repeat fixed center 0; /*this will put the image at the top-middle of this div*/
    width: 100%; /*this sets this div to whatever size the window is, which helps with removing the horizontal scrollbar*/
    height: 100px;
    text-align: center; /*this will move any child elements to the center (specifically for ie)*/
    pointer-events: none;
    overflow: hidden; /*this hides any child elements that are outside the range of this element*/
}
#header{
    width: 998px;
    margin: 0 auto; /*center header for all browsers except ie*/
    height:100px;
    z-index: 1;
    pointer-events: none;
    text-align: left; /*makes sure that contents are lined up to the left (otherwise inherited from the parent which is center)*/
}

I also changed some of the style to make everything center cross-browser. And to keep the horizontal scrollbar from showing up, you set the #headerwrap's overflow property to hidden.

That should solve both your issues.

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This is a good answer too but your comments should really use the correct syntax of /* */ so doing this would have been less tedious jsfiddle.net/w8P2S/6 ;) –  baraboom Jun 25 '11 at 3:34
    
Oh, Haha. Sorry about that. I don't get to do much web programming anymore. I mostly do c#, which the above syntax would have worked fine. I'll change that. –  dbooth Jun 25 '11 at 3:44
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