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Given

L1 = {w belongs to {a,b}* | has as many a as b}

Define a CFG G such that L(G)= L1

In my opinion these productions should be the right answer

1) S → aSa

2) S → bSb

3) S → ε

My reasoning was:

L1 contains strings like { ab,aabb,aaabbb,...etc}

Now I have a doubt: if I apply the above productions , in a nutshell:

S → aSa
I apply the 1) so I get S → aSa → aaSaa the I choose 2) an I get S → aSa → aaSaa → aabSbaa and then using the empty string I get the final string S → aSa → aaSaa → aabSbaa → aabbaa

Now, maybe I'm wrong but in the string aabbaathe number of a is not equal to the number of b

Any help will be highly appreciated

Joachim

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Anyway, consider this input which is not matched: "abab". Therefore, the posted productions can't be the right answer. Happy theoreticalstuffitizing. –  user166390 Jun 25 '11 at 8:45
    
If you think that my post should be tagged as homework..I do hope someone can explain to me where I make mistakes and why.. –  Joachim Jun 25 '11 at 8:46
2  
After every production, the number of as and bs should be equal. You current solution depends on choosing the right productions but as you already noticed, this cannot be guaranteed. You have to make sure that every production generates a valid word. –  Felix Kling Jun 25 '11 at 8:47
    
consider this input which is not matched: "abab"...So how should I solve the problem? –  Joachim Jun 25 '11 at 8:48
    
I like Felix's direction :) –  user166390 Jun 25 '11 at 8:51

3 Answers 3

Assuming the L1 is in fact {a^nb^n | n ≥ 0}, the grammar you provided cannot (as you proved yourself) produce exactly L1. To satisfy the requirement that, loosely expressed, "the number of a's on the left side of a word must be equal to the number of b's on its right side", your objective is to find a grammar that enforces that requirement after each and every one of its productions.

Another way to think about this is: you are not allowed to use productions in your grammar that do not generate an equal number of a and b.

edit: Since this isn't homework, I'll go ahead and give the answer:

V = {A}, Σ = {a, b}, S = A, and R the set of rules:

(1) A -> aAbA | bAaA
(2) A -> ε
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What about abab? Your grammar produces some strings with same number of a's and b's but not all. –  Howard Jun 25 '11 at 9:31
    
You're right, I'd completely left out one rule, thanks. –  Michael Foukarakis Jun 25 '11 at 16:50
    
I still think you don't get all possible words with your solution. E.g. As I understand a word can start with a and also end with a (e.g. abba) which is not possible with your rules. –  Howard Jun 27 '11 at 16:26
    
@Howard aAbA => aAbbAaA =>* abba –  1010 May 16 at 3:31
    
how can it not be homework? –  1010 May 16 at 3:32

This is a standard class exercise, which does not yet have a correct answer.

1) S -> aSb
2) S -> bSa
3) S -> SS
4) S -> ε

Any number of a's and b's in any order, including the empty string.


There are quite a few online class notes with the answers and proofs. Examples: here, here, here, and here to show a few.

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Sorry maybe I'm wrong but Michael Foukarakis'solution doesn't work

Basically these two rules do not provide strings having the same number of a and b.

(1) A -> aAb

(2) A -> ε

Take A -> aAb and then apply the 1) rule, you have A -> aAb ->aaAb and then??? If you apply the 2) you end up getting A -> aAb ->aaAb ->aab

I think the right answer is:

1)S->aSbS

2)S->bSaS

3) S->ε

Even though I get strings like : abab or aababb Actually they both fulfill the initial requirements , which is :

the string must contain the same number of a and b.

(it doesn't matter how the elements are arranged..)

Comments, of course are welcome and encouraged.

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You say A -> aAb -> aaAb - how that? Is there a rule which replaces A by a? –  Oben Sonne Jun 25 '11 at 18:55

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