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After reading the answer for the question: JavaScript inner-functions and Performance

I wonder if it somehow possible to cache the inner function(doSomethingCool) in this case:

function newUser(user){
         function doSomethingCool(){
                 console.log(user);
         } 
}
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I don't wanna change the signature/definition of newUSer –  user815070 Jun 25 '11 at 9:15
    
just to be clear i want to cache 'doSomethingCool' –  user815070 Jun 25 '11 at 9:34
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You cannot really cache a closure. If you do, then it still closes over the variables of the function it was first defined.

For example, you might consider doing this, which might look ok at a first glance:

var newUser = (function() {
    var doSomethingCool;

    function newUser(user){
         doSomethingCool = doSomethingCool || function(){console.log(user);};
         doSomethingCool();
    }

    return newUser;
}());

The first time we call newUser, the doSomethingCool function will be created. This is the output:

> newUser('foo')
  foo

When we call the function a second time, the closure is reused. This is the output:

> newUser('bar')
  foo

Why? Because the closure only closes of the variables of the function invocation it was defined in.

If you really want to "cache" the function, you have to parameterize it:

var newUser = (function() {
    var doSomethingCool;

    function newUser(user){
         doSomethingCool = doSomethingCool || function(user){console.log(user);};
         doSomethingCool(user);
    }

    return newUser;
}());

But I would not call this a closure. Technically it is a closure, but you don't make use of this property.

And actually, it is much easier then to write it like this:

var newUser = (function() {
    var doSomethingCool = function(user){...};

    function newUser(user){
         doSomethingCool(user);
    }

    return newUser;
}());
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I don't want to change the newUser function definition, the internal impl of newUser can be whatever... –  user815070 Jun 25 '11 at 9:20
1  
@browsingLoops: I would argue that the definition of a function is its implementation. –  Felix Kling Jun 25 '11 at 9:29
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The point of using a closure is to preserve the context in which it was created. If you "cache" your closure the reference to user will always be the same, defeating the purpose. What you probably want is something like:

function User(name) {
   this.name = name;
}

User.prototype.doSomethingCool = function() {
   console.log(this.name);
}

var userA = new User('a');
var userB = new User('b');

userA.doSomethingCool();
userB.doSomethingCool();

With that code, only one doSomethingCool function is created on the prototype of User, but it's behavior changes based on how it is called.

If you are just looking to make a utility function that's only used within newUser but doesn't take advantage of the properties of closures, you'd probably be better off moving the function and accepting the user as an argument. That said, I highly doubt leaving it there will impact your performance in any noticeable way.

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