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I have a client application that communicates with a server. In this application the clients can send requests to the server in order to reserve hotel rooms. The problems is that, if I have one room left, it is possible that two clients get a reservation.

I have no idea how to avoid it, for this reason I have no code implemented to show. If I had to guess, I would implement like a singleton.

  if (availableRooms()>0) {

      synchronized(syncObject_) {

        if (availableRooms()>0) {
           makeReservation()
        }

      }

    }
    return instance_;
  }

Is that an acceptable solution? Does it work?

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@little bunny foo foo The question is why he's using double check locking. If he's synchronizing over this as you advise or over a separate object is another decision. Both have advantages: the first one better readable code the latter is more robust. DB transactions are good here but not available in every DBMS. –  Fabian Barney Jun 25 '11 at 16:02
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This will only work if you only have one server. If you need to ever scale up, requests may come to different servers and synchronized will not work. In this case you probably will use database anyway and you should use db transactions.

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+1 for db transactions –  Fabian Barney Jun 25 '11 at 15:30
    
This is the correct suggestion: use database transactions or a stored procedure to reserve the room. The database is the only single place where the mutual exclusion can be implemented successfully. –  Kyle Burton Jun 25 '11 at 15:56
    
@Kyle Burton That's very dogmatic point of view. You can have topologies where it is necessary to synchronize it at application level, i.e. when multiple DBs are involved or simply other data sources where you do not have db transactions. Saying synchronisation can only be done in DB is simply wrong. Nevertheless it will be best suggestion in most cases, I agree. –  Fabian Barney Jun 25 '11 at 16:16
    
Fatal: you're right about the being too dogmatic part. Distributed synchronization is complicated, for this type of app, as we've both said, the DB is the right trade off. Reservations for a single hotel probably won't need PAXOS :) I'll try to be less dogmatic next time. Thank you for the feedback. Regards, Kyle –  Kyle Burton Jun 25 '11 at 16:34
    
Hi! Sorry for the delay on replying. Thanks a lot on the hint, I will do as you suggested :) thanks! –  Oscar Jun 27 '11 at 16:45
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Your code looks like double check idiom.

But your idea is fine as long as there is only one singleton you synchronize on. (In your example it is syncObject_.) You may have more i.e. when you have more servers running for load balancing. Have a singleton for reservation and do the check for free rooms and the reservation itself in one synchronized scope.

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In order to avoid allowing two people to reserve the same room, you have to make sure that only one thread can access whatever object provides the rooms. The most readable way to do this would be to synchronize on the object providing the room reservation service so in this case, you could probably do

synchronized(this){
    //...
    makeReservation()
    //...
}

However, as long as there is only one instance of _syncObject available to all the threads and there is no other place in your code that can possibly call makeReservation(), your method would work as well.

Note, if you are using a database, you can simply set your database's isolation level to SERIALIZABLE, do a database transaction for makeReservation(), and the database will take care of all this for you.

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Even when it's often done in Java, I will highly recommend to not synchronize on this. It's what I learned in the C# world and I think they are right, when they're saying you cannot control that others synchronize on your object, too. So always synchronize on your private dummy object. I am not a Microsoft fanboy, but I think they're right here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/c5kehkcz%28v=vs.80%29.aspx –  Fabian Barney Jun 25 '11 at 15:28
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