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What is your favorite method to handle errors in BASH? The best example of handling errors in BASH I have found on the web was written by William Shotts, Jr at http://www.linuxcommand.org.

William Shotts, Jr suggests using the following function for error handling in BASH:

#!/bin/bash

# A slicker error handling routine

# I put a variable in my scripts named PROGNAME which
# holds the name of the program being run.  You can get this
# value from the first item on the command line ($0).

# Reference: This was copied from <http://www.linuxcommand.org/wss0150.php>

PROGNAME=$(basename $0)

function error_exit
{

#   ----------------------------------------------------------------
#   Function for exit due to fatal program error
#   	Accepts 1 argument:
#   		string containing descriptive error message
#   ----------------------------------------------------------------


    echo "${PROGNAME}: ${1:-"Unknown Error"}" 1>&2
    exit 1
}

# Example call of the error_exit function.  Note the inclusion
# of the LINENO environment variable.  It contains the current
# line number.

echo "Example of error with line number and message"
error_exit "$LINENO: An error has occurred."

Do you have a better error handling routine that you use in BASH scripts?

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12 Answers 12

Use a trap!

tempfiles=( )
cleanup() {
  rm -f "${tempfiles[@]}"
}
trap cleanup 0

error() {
  local parent_lineno="$1"
  local message="$2"
  local code="${3:-1}"
  if [[ -n "$message" ]] ; then
    echo "Error on or near line ${parent_lineno}: ${message}; exiting with status ${code}"
  else
    echo "Error on or near line ${parent_lineno}; exiting with status ${code}"
  fi
  exit "${code}"
}
trap 'error ${LINENO}' ERR

...then, whenever you create a temporary file:

temp_foo="$(mktemp -t foobar.XXXXXX)"
tempfiles+=( "$temp_foo" )

and $temp_foo will be deleted on exit, and the current line number will be printed. (set -e will likewise give you exit-on-error behavior, though it comes with some caveats).

You can either let the trap call error for you (in which case it uses the default exit code of 1 and no message) or call it yourself and provide explicit values; for instance:

error ${LINENO} "the foobar failed" 2

will exit with status 2, and give an explicit message.

share|improve this answer
3  
@draemon the variable capitalization is intentional. All-caps is conventional only for shell builtins and environment variables -- using lowercase for everything else prevents namespace conflicts. See also stackoverflow.com/questions/673055/… –  Charles Duffy Jun 9 '11 at 3:25
    
before you break it again, test your change. Conventions are a good thing, but they're secondary to functioning code. –  Draemon Jun 9 '11 at 21:10
1  
@Draemon, I actually disagree. Obviously-broken code gets noticed and fixed. Bad-practices but mostly-working code lives forever (and gets propagated). –  Charles Duffy May 22 at 16:55
    
but you didn't notice. Broken code get noticed because functioning code is the primary concern. –  Draemon Jul 11 at 18:54
    
@Draemon, the function keyword is bad practice, introducing gratuitous incompatibility with POSIX sh for no benefit whatsoever (as opposed to this code's other incompatibilities with POSIX sh, which add value). I'd appreciate it, at this point, if you'd let my code be. –  Charles Duffy Aug 29 at 19:23

That's a fine solution. I just wanted to add

set -e

as a rudimentary error mechanism. It will immediately stop your script if a simple command fails. I think this should have been the default behavior: since such errors almost always signify something unexpected, it is not really 'sane' to keep executing the following commands.

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9  
set -e is not without gotchas: See mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/105 for several. –  Charles Duffy Jul 30 '12 at 16:41
1  
@CharlesDuffy, some of the gotchas can be overcome with set -o pipefail –  hobs Sep 7 '12 at 22:31
5  
@CharlesDuffy Thanks for pointing to the gotchas; overall though, I still think set -e has a high benefit-cost ratio. –  Bruno De Fraine Sep 11 '12 at 8:21
    
@BrunoDeFraine I use set -e myself, but a number of the other regulars in irc.freenode.org#bash advise (in quite strong terms) against it. At a minimum, the gotchas in question should be well-understood. –  Charles Duffy Sep 11 '12 at 13:17
1  
set -e -o pipefail -u # and know what you are doing –  Sam Watkins Jul 3 at 8:32

Reading all the answers on this page inspired me a lot.

So, here's my hint:

file content: lib.trap.sh

lib_name='trap'
lib_version=20121026

stderr_log="/dev/shm/stderr.log"

#
# TO BE SOURCED ONLY ONCE:
#
###~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~##

if test "${g_libs[$lib_name]+_}"; then
    return 0
else
    if test ${#g_libs[@]} == 0; then
        declare -A g_libs
    fi
    g_libs[$lib_name]=$lib_version
fi


#
# MAIN CODE:
#
###~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~##

set -o pipefail  # trace ERR through pipes
set -o errtrace  # trace ERR through 'time command' and other functions
set -o nounset   ## set -u : exit the script if you try to use an uninitialised variable
set -o errexit   ## set -e : exit the script if any statement returns a non-true return value

exec 2>"$stderr_log"


###~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~##
#
# FUNCTION: EXIT_HANDLER
#
###~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~##

function exit_handler ()
{
    local error_code="$?"

    test $error_code == 0 && return;

    #
    # LOCAL VARIABLES:
    # ------------------------------------------------------------------
    #    
    local i=0
    local regex=''
    local mem=''

    local error_file=''
    local error_lineno=''
    local error_message='unknown'

    local lineno=''


    #
    # PRINT THE HEADER:
    # ------------------------------------------------------------------
    #
    # Color the output if it's an interactive terminal
    test -t 1 && tput bold; tput setf 4                                 ## red bold
    echo -e "\n(!) EXIT HANDLER:\n"


    #
    # GETTING LAST ERROR OCCURRED:
    # ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ #

    #
    # Read last file from the error log
    # ------------------------------------------------------------------
    #
    if test -f "$stderr_log"
        then
            stderr=$( tail -n 1 "$stderr_log" )
            rm "$stderr_log"
    fi

    #
    # Managing the line to extract information:
    # ------------------------------------------------------------------
    #

    if test -n "$stderr"
        then        
            # Exploding stderr on :
            mem="$IFS"
            local shrunk_stderr=$( echo "$stderr" | sed 's/\: /\:/g' )
            IFS=':'
            local stderr_parts=( $shrunk_stderr )
            IFS="$mem"

            # Storing information on the error
            error_file="${stderr_parts[0]}"
            error_lineno="${stderr_parts[1]}"
            error_message=""

            for (( i = 3; i <= ${#stderr_parts[@]}; i++ ))
                do
                    error_message="$error_message "${stderr_parts[$i-1]}": "
            done

            # Removing last ':' (colon character)
            error_message="${error_message%:*}"

            # Trim
            error_message="$( echo "$error_message" | sed -e 's/^[ \t]*//' | sed -e 's/[ \t]*$//' )"
    fi

    #
    # GETTING BACKTRACE:
    # ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ #
    _backtrace=$( backtrace 2 )


    #
    # MANAGING THE OUTPUT:
    # ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ #

    local lineno=""
    regex='^([a-z]{1,}) ([0-9]{1,})$'

    if [[ $error_lineno =~ $regex ]]

        # The error line was found on the log
        # (e.g. type 'ff' without quotes wherever)
        # --------------------------------------------------------------
        then
            local row="${BASH_REMATCH[1]}"
            lineno="${BASH_REMATCH[2]}"

            echo -e "FILE:\t\t${error_file}"
            echo -e "${row^^}:\t\t${lineno}\n"

            echo -e "ERROR CODE:\t${error_code}"             
            test -t 1 && tput setf 6                                    ## white yellow
            echo -e "ERROR MESSAGE:\n$error_message"


        else
            regex="^${error_file}\$|^${error_file}\s+|\s+${error_file}\s+|\s+${error_file}\$"
            if [[ "$_backtrace" =~ $regex ]]

                # The file was found on the log but not the error line
                # (could not reproduce this case so far)
                # ------------------------------------------------------
                then
                    echo -e "FILE:\t\t$error_file"
                    echo -e "ROW:\t\tunknown\n"

                    echo -e "ERROR CODE:\t${error_code}"
                    test -t 1 && tput setf 6                            ## white yellow
                    echo -e "ERROR MESSAGE:\n${stderr}"

                # Neither the error line nor the error file was found on the log
                # (e.g. type 'cp ffd fdf' without quotes wherever)
                # ------------------------------------------------------
                else
                    #
                    # The error file is the first on backtrace list:

                    # Exploding backtrace on newlines
                    mem=$IFS
                    IFS='
                    '
                    #
                    # Substring: I keep only the carriage return
                    # (others needed only for tabbing purpose)
                    IFS=${IFS:0:1}
                    local lines=( $_backtrace )

                    IFS=$mem

                    error_file=""

                    if test -n "${lines[1]}"
                        then
                            array=( ${lines[1]} )

                            for (( i=2; i<${#array[@]}; i++ ))
                                do
                                    error_file="$error_file ${array[$i]}"
                            done

                            # Trim
                            error_file="$( echo "$error_file" | sed -e 's/^[ \t]*//' | sed -e 's/[ \t]*$//' )"
                    fi

                    echo -e "FILE:\t\t$error_file"
                    echo -e "ROW:\t\tunknown\n"

                    echo -e "ERROR CODE:\t${error_code}"
                    test -t 1 && tput setf 6                            ## white yellow
                    if test -n "${stderr}"
                        then
                            echo -e "ERROR MESSAGE:\n${stderr}"
                        else
                            echo -e "ERROR MESSAGE:\n${error_message}"
                    fi
            fi
    fi

    #
    # PRINTING THE BACKTRACE:
    # ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ #

    test -t 1 && tput setf 7                                            ## white bold
    echo -e "\n$_backtrace\n"

    #
    # EXITING:
    # ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ #

    test -t 1 && tput setf 4                                            ## red bold
    echo "Exiting!"

    test -t 1 && tput sgr0 # Reset terminal

    exit "$error_code"
}
trap exit_handler EXIT                                                  # ! ! ! TRAP EXIT ! ! !
trap exit ERR                                                           # ! ! ! TRAP ERR ! ! !


###~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~##
#
# FUNCTION: BACKTRACE
#
###~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~##

function backtrace
{
    local _start_from_=0

    local params=( "$@" )
    if (( "${#params[@]}" >= "1" ))
        then
            _start_from_="$1"
    fi

    local i=0
    local first=false
    while caller $i > /dev/null
    do
        if test -n "$_start_from_" && (( "$i" + 1   >= "$_start_from_" ))
            then
                if test "$first" == false
                    then
                        echo "BACKTRACE IS:"
                        first=true
                fi
                caller $i
        fi
        let "i=i+1"
    done
}

return 0



Example of usage:
file content: trap-test.sh

#!/bin/bash

source 'lib.trap.sh'

echo "doing something wrong now .."
echo "$foo"

exit 0


Running:

bash trap-test.sh

Output:

doing something wrong now ..

(!) EXIT HANDLER:

FILE:       trap-test.sh
LINE:       6

ERROR CODE: 1
ERROR MESSAGE:
foo:   unassigned variable

BACKTRACE IS:
1 main trap-test.sh

Exiting!


As you can see from the screenshot below, the output is colored and the error message comes in the used language.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
this thing is awesome.. you should create a github project for it, so people can easily make improvements and contribute back. I combined it with log4bash and together it creates a powerful env for creating good bash scripts. –  Dominik Dorn Dec 15 '13 at 0:13
1  
FYI -- test ${#g_libs[@]} == 0 isn't POSIX-compliant (POSIX test supports = for string comparisons or -eq for numeric comparisons, but not ==, not to mention the lack of arrays in POSIX), and if you're not trying to be POSIX compliant, why in the world are you using test at all rather than a math context? (( ${#g_libs[@]} == 0 )) is, after all, easier to read. –  Charles Duffy Feb 14 at 20:24
    
The function keyword is also non-POSIX; the compatible way to declare functions is foo() { ... }, with no function keyword at all. –  Charles Duffy Feb 14 at 20:24

An equivalent alternative to "set -e" is

set -o errexit

It makes the meaning of the flag somewhat clearer than just "-e".

Random addition: to temporarily disable the flag, and return to the default (of continuing execution regardless of exit codes), just use

set +e
echo "commands run here returning non-zero exit codes will not cause the entire script to fail"
echo "false returns 1 as an exit code"
false
set -e

This precludes proper error handling mentioned in other responses, but is quick & effective (just like bash).

share|improve this answer
    
using $(foo) on a bare line rather than just foo is usually the Wrong Thing. Why promote it by giving it as an example? –  Charles Duffy Apr 8 '13 at 17:28

I prefer something really easy to call. So I use something that looks a little complicated, but is easy to use. I usually just copy-and-paste the code below into my scripts. An explanation follows the code.

#This function is used to cleanly exit any script. It does this displaying a
# given error message, and exiting with an error code.
function error_exit {
    echo
    echo "$@"
    exit 1
}
#Trap the killer signals so that we can exit with a good message.
trap "error_exit 'Received signal SIGHUP'" SIGHUP
trap "error_exit 'Received signal SIGINT'" SIGINT
trap "error_exit 'Received signal SIGTERM'" SIGTERM

#Alias the function so that it will print a message with the following format:
#prog-name(@line#): message
#We have to explicitly allow aliases, we do this because they make calling the
#function much easier (see example).
shopt -s expand_aliases
alias die='error_exit "Error ${0}(@`echo $(( $LINENO - 1 ))`):"'

I usually put a call to the cleanup function in side the error_exit function, but this varies from script to script so I left it out. The traps catch the common terminating signals and make sure everything gets cleaned up. The alias is what does the real magic. I like to check everything for failure. So in general I call programs in an "if !" type statement. By subtracting 1 from the line number the alias will tell me where the failure occurred. It is also dead simple to call, and pretty much idiot proof. Below is an example (just replace /bin/false with whatever you are going to call).

#This is an example useage, it will print out
#Error prog-name (@1): Who knew false is false.
if ! /bin/false ; then
    die "Who knew false is false."
fi
share|improve this answer

Another consideration is the exit code to return. Just "1" is pretty standard, although there are a handful of reserved exit codes that bash itself uses, and that same page argues that user-defined codes should be in the range 64-113 to conform to C/C++ standards.

You might also consider the bit vector approach that mount uses for its exit codes:

 0  success
 1  incorrect invocation or permissions
 2  system error (out of memory, cannot fork, no more loop devices)
 4  internal mount bug or missing nfs support in mount
 8  user interrupt
16  problems writing or locking /etc/mtab
32  mount failure
64  some mount succeeded

OR-ing the codes together allows your script to signal multiple simultaneous errors.

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I've used

die() {
        echo $1
        kill $$
}

before; i think because 'exit' was failing for me for some reason. The above defaults seem like a good idea, though.

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This has served me well for a while now. It prints error or warning messages in red, one line per parameter, and allows an optional exit code.

# Custom errors
EX_UNKNOWN=1

warning()
{
    # Output warning messages
    # Color the output red if it's an interactive terminal
    # @param $1...: Messages

    test -t 1 && tput setf 4

    printf '%s\n' "$@" >&2

    test -t 1 && tput sgr0 # Reset terminal
    true
}

error()
{
    # Output error messages with optional exit code
    # @param $1...: Messages
    # @param $N: Exit code (optional)

    messages=( "$@" )

    # If the last parameter is a number, it's not part of the messages
    last_parameter="${messages[@]: -1}"
    if [[ "$last_parameter" =~ ^[0-9]*$ ]]
    then
        exit_code=$last_parameter
        unset messages[$((${#messages[@]} - 1))]
    fi

    warning "${messages[@]}"

    exit ${exit_code:-$EX_UNKNOWN}
}
share|improve this answer

You can use the "caller" built-in to automatically provide the location of the call to your "die with a message" function, or even to print an entire back-trace.

You can download some bash functions to do that from http://jimavera.cixx6.com/Carp.bash

Perl programmers will feel right at home with these.

(Sorry, I could not put the actual code in this post because stackoverflow's website does not seem to provide any way to insert code so it won't be corrupted. the 'pre' tag removes any less-than symbols from the "pre formatted" text, and the 'code' tag does some prettyprinting which makes the code no longer valid Bash. Too fancy for its own good!)

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1  
the link you provided is no longer working –  Luca Borrione Sep 2 '12 at 19:27

I use the following trap code, it also allows errors to be traced through pipes and 'time' commands

#!/bin/bash
set -o pipefail  # trace ERR through pipes
set -o errtrace  # trace ERR through 'time command' and other functions
function error() {
    JOB="$0"              # job name
    LASTLINE="$1"         # line of error occurrence
    LASTERR="$2"          # error code
    echo "ERROR in ${JOB} : line ${LASTLINE} with exit code ${LASTERR}"
    exit 1
}
trap 'error ${LINENO} ${?}' ERR
share|improve this answer
3  
The function keyword is gratuitously POSIX-incompatible. Consider making your declaration just error() {, with no function before it. –  Charles Duffy Apr 8 '13 at 17:29
2  
${$?} should just be $?, or ${?} if you insist on using unnecessary braces; the inner $ is wrong. –  Charles Duffy Apr 14 '13 at 22:28

This trick is useful for missing commands or functions. The name of the missing function (or executable) will be passed in $_

function handle_error {
    status=$?
    last_call=$1

    # 127 is 'command not found'
    (( status != 127 )) && return

    echo "you tried to call $last_call"
    return
}

# Trap errors.
trap 'handle_error "$_"' ERR
share|improve this answer

Not sure if this will be helpful to you, but I modified some of the suggested functions here in order to include the check for the error (exit code from prior command) within it. On each "check" I also pass as a parameter the "message" of what the error is for logging purposes.

#!/bin/bash

function error_exit
{

    if [ "$?" != "0" ]; then
        log.sh "$1"
        exit 1
    fi
}

Now to call it within the same script (or in another one if I use export -f error_exit) I simply write the name of the function and pass a message as parameter, like this:

#!/bin/bash

cd /home/myuser/afolder
error_exit "Unable to switch to folder"

rm *
error_exit "Unable to delete all files"

Using this I was able to create a really robust bash file for some automated process and it will stop in case of errors and notify me (log.sh will do that)

share|improve this answer
    
Consider using the POSIX syntax for defining functions -- no function keyword, just error_exit() {. –  Charles Duffy Apr 8 '13 at 17:30
    
is there a reason why you don't just do cd /home/myuser/afolder || error_exit "Unable to switch to folder" ? –  Pierre-Olivier Vares Jul 29 at 15:59

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