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Can you have a Math.Random function and use a selection sort to sort it out?

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a bit more explanation please. –  Lobo Jun 25 '11 at 16:10
    
@Lucy: Could you be more specific on your question? Yes there is a Math.Random in java. What do you want to sort from where? –  Marnix Jun 25 '11 at 16:10
    
@Lucy So I understand, that you want to create a list of random numbers. And then sort them? –  Marnix Jun 25 '11 at 16:15
4  
Answering the exact question asked: No. Math.Random returns a single value, and therefore there's nothing to sort. –  Ken White Jun 25 '11 at 16:35
    
@Lucy wants for you to show her how to do a selection sort in Java. –  Marcelo Jun 25 '11 at 17:28

3 Answers 3

You could even create directly a random sorted collection if you want. For instance you could take random numbers in non overlapping increasing ranges, a simple implementation that comes to my mind is using each (predecessor + a minor quantity) as the minimum for the range in which you take the next random number.

Or even a straightforward code like this :

double[] tab = new double[ N ];
tab[ 0 ] = Math.random();
for( int i=1; i < N; i ++ ) 
   tab[ i ] = tab[ i - 1 ] + Math.random();

Regards, Stéphane

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I mean like instead of having something like int [] = { 32. 45, 454, 232, 2}; I was wondering is there a way you can use a Math. random function that gives you random numbers and you use the selection sort to sort it out. –  Lucy Jun 25 '11 at 16:11
    
@Snicolas: You mean Collections.shuffle()? –  Marnix Jun 25 '11 at 16:12
    
@Lucy, why do you care about the algorithm to sort it out ? –  Snicolas Jun 25 '11 at 16:14
    
what do you mean. I just want to use the selection sort to sort out the random numbers its for an assignment I have to do. –  Lucy Jun 25 '11 at 16:15
1  
And what did you try so far to implement the selection sort algorithm ? –  Snicolas Jun 25 '11 at 16:26
final int intCount = 128;
final int intSize = 1024;

int myArray[] = new int[intCount];
for (int i = 0; i < intCount; i++) {
    myArray[i] = java.lang.Math.random() * intSize;
}

// TODO: Your selection sort code here
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@Lucy Is that what you wanted. I think we all are having problems understanding what you mean. –  aalku Jun 25 '11 at 16:57
    
Please don't answer posts like this that are not real questions. It not only will probably be closed soon, but it encourages people to post other similar non-questions and adds lots of clutter; that clutter makes SO less useful. Thanks. –  Ken White Jun 25 '11 at 19:54

Yes, instead of

  int [] j = { 32. 45, 454, 232, 2};

you can use

  Random r = new Random();      
  int [] j = { r.nextInt(), r.nextInt(), r.nextInt(), r.nextInt() };
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Please don't answer posts like this that are not real questions. It not only will probably be closed soon, but it encourages people to post other similar non-questions and adds lots of clutter; that clutter makes SO less useful. Thanks. –  Ken White Jun 25 '11 at 19:54
    
I did think it was a genuine question after reading her comment: <quote>I mean like instead of having something like int [] = { 32. 45, 454, 232, 2}; I was wondering is there a way you can use a Math. random function that gives you random numbers and you use the selection sort to sort it out.</quote> –  Miserable Variable Jun 27 '11 at 13:42
    
Then you should have asked her to improve the question first. As is, it's totally useless to anyone in the future, because it's not searchable. Instead of trying to improve your own rep by posting an "I'm guessing" answer, you should have tried to improve the usefulness of the question for others by asking her to clarify it first. –  Ken White Jun 29 '11 at 11:00
    
Since you have already decided my motive was to increase my rep (contradicting my claim that I was trying to help the OP) there is nothing more to say. Go ahead and downvote, you have the power. –  Miserable Variable Jul 1 '11 at 5:01

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