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In application frameworks I keep seeing frameworks that allow you to pass in multiple Int values (generally used in place of an enum) into a function.

For example:

public class Example
{ 
    public class Values
    {
        public static final int ONE = 0x7f020000;
        public static final int TWO = 0x7f020001;
        public static final int THREE = 0x7f020002;
        public static final int FOUR = 0x7f020003;
        public static final int FIVE = 0x7f020004;
    }

    public static void main(String [] args)
    {
    	// should evaluate just Values.ONE
    	Example.multiValueExample(Values.ONE);

    	// should evalueate just values Values.ONE,  Values.THREE, Values.FIVE
    	Example.multiValueExample(Values.ONE | Values.THREE | Values.FIVE);

    	// should evalueate just values Values.TWO , Values.FIVE
    	Example.multiValueExample(Values.TWO | Values.FIVE);
    }

    public static void multiValueExample(int values){
    	// Logic that properly evaluates bitwise values
    	...
    }
}

So what logic should exist in multiValueExample for me to properly evaluate multiple int values being passed in using the bitwise operator?

share|improve this question
    
Please clarify. I don't understand. Those are not multiple values. Values.ONE | Values.THREE | Values.FIVE = 0x7f020006, right? And what's the purpose of the unnamed bits? –  John Saunders Mar 15 '09 at 15:58
    
Is there a specific reason why you want to use bitwise operations? The enum/EnumSet solutions are clearner and more Java-like. –  Joachim Sauer Mar 15 '09 at 19:42

8 Answers 8

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Your values should be powers of 2.

That way, you don't lose any information when you bitwise-OR them.

public static final int ONE   = 0x01;
public static final int TWO   = 0x02;
public static final int THREE = 0x04;
public static final int FOUR  = 0x08;
public static final int FIVE  = 0x10;

etc.

Then you can do this:

public static void main(String [] args) {
    Example.multiValueExample(Values.ONE | Values.THREE | Values.FIVE);
}

public static void multiValueExample(int values){
    if ((values & Values.ONE) == Values.ONE) {
    }

    if ((values & Values.TWO) == Values.TWO) {
    }

    // etc.
}
share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't that be a Bitwise AND (single &)? –  Hamid Mar 15 '09 at 16:01
    
I believe you mean powers of 2, not multiples of 2. You can't distinguish 2 | 4 from 6. Also, && is logical AND, not binary AND, so it will always evaluate to true. –  Joao da Silva Mar 15 '09 at 16:01
    
@Hamid and Joao: thanks for the corrections. –  Can Berk Güder Mar 15 '09 at 16:03
    
i found the best way to set up the numbers was int ONE = 0x1; int TWO = 0x1 << 1; int THREE = 0x1 <<2; etc –  schwiz Oct 15 '10 at 8:42

As was already mentioned, consider use of enums instead of bit values.

According to Effective Java 2: "Item 32: Use EnumSet instead of bit fields"

Usage of EnumSet is quite effective for memory usage and very convenient.

Here is an example:

package enums;

import java.util.EnumSet;
import java.util.Set;

public class Example {
  public enum Values {
    ONE, TWO, THREE, FOUR, FIVE
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    // should evaluate just Values.ONE
    Example.multiValueExample(EnumSet.of(Values.ONE));

    // should evalueate just values Values.ONE, Values.THREE, Values.FIVE
    Example.multiValueExample(EnumSet.of(Values.ONE, Values.THREE, Values.FIVE));

    // should evalueate just values Values.TWO , Values.FIVE
    Example.multiValueExample(EnumSet.of(Values.TWO, Values.FIVE));
  }

  public static void multiValueExample(Set<Values> values) {
    if (values.contains(Values.ONE)) {
      System.out.println("One");
    }

    // Other checks here...

    if (values.contains(Values.FIVE)) {
      System.out.println("Five");
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 the most Java-like solution –  Joachim Sauer Mar 15 '09 at 19:39
    
Yes, thanks for this solution. Unfortunately I'm working with mobile technology where enums take quite a hit in terms of memory management. As such, I'm using bitwise operation to improve preformance. –  AtariPete Mar 16 '09 at 15:23
    
Agree, in a mobile application it makes sense. –  Andrey Vityuk Mar 16 '09 at 17:13

First, you can't define the Values that way to do bitwise comparisons. Instead, set different bits:

public static final int ONE   = 0x1;  // First bit is set
public static final int TWO   = 0x2;  // Second bit is set
public static final int THREE = 0x4;  // Third bit is set
public static final int FOUR  = 0x8;  // Fourth bit is set
public static final int FIVE  = 0x10; // Fifth bit is set

Second, you should probably be using java.util.BitSet for these sorts of operations:

BitSet bits = new BitSet(5);
bits.set(2);
bits.set(4);

System.out.println("these bits are set: " + bits);
// Prints "these bits are set: {2, 4}"

BitSet otherBits = new BitSet(5);
otherBits.set(3);
otherBits.set(4);

System.out.println("these bits are set: " + bits.or(otherBits));
// Prints "these bits are set: {2, 3, 4}"
share|improve this answer
    
Is there anything Java doesn't have a class for? =) –  Can Berk Güder Mar 15 '09 at 16:07
    
Yep! stackoverflow.com/questions/639035/… ;) –  John Feminella Mar 15 '09 at 16:14
    
haha, that function only exists in Python (xkcd.com/353). =) –  Can Berk Güder Mar 15 '09 at 23:36

Well if they are powers of 2 you would do something like the "display" method in the code below.

Here is a link in wikipedia on the topic as well which should explain why you want powers of 2.

public class Main
{
    private static final int A = 0x01;
    private static final int B = 0x02;
    private static final int C = 0x04;

    public static void main(final String[] argv)
    {
        display(A);
        display(B);
        display(C);
        display(A | A);
        display(A | B);
        display(A | C);
        display(B | A);
        display(B | B);
        display(B | C);
        display(C | A);
        display(C | B);
        display(C | C);
        display(A | A | A);
        display(A | A | B);
        display(A | A | C);
        display(A | B | A);
        display(A | B | B);
        display(A | B | C);
        display(A | C | A);
        display(A | C | B);
        display(A | C | C);
        display(B | A | A);
        display(B | A | B);
        display(B | A | C);
        display(B | B | A);
        display(B | B | B);
        display(B | B | C);
        display(B | C | A);
        display(B | C | B);
        display(B | C | C);
        display(C | A | A);
        display(C | A | B);
        display(C | A | C);
        display(C | B | A);
        display(C | B | B);
        display(C | B | C);
        display(C | C | A);
        display(C | C | B);
        display(C | C | C);
    }

    private static void display(final int val)
    {
        if((val & A) != 0)
        {
            System.out.print("A");
        }

        if((val & B) != 0)
        {
            System.out.print("B");
        }

        if((val & C) != 0)
        {
            System.out.print("C");
        }

        System.out.println();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Using bit masks were popular when every bit counted. Another way to do this today is to use enums with are simpler to manipulate and extend.

import static Example.Values.*;
import java.util.Arrays;

public class Example {
    public enum Values { ONE, TWO, THREE, FOUR, FIVE }

    public static void main(String [] args) {
        // should evaluate just Values.ONE
        multiValueExample(ONE);

        // should evaluate just values Values.ONE,  Values.THREE, Values.FIVE
        multiValueExample(ONE, THREE, FIVE);

        // should evaluate just values Values.TWO , Values.FIVE
        multiValueExample(TWO, FIVE);
    }

    public static void multiValueExample(Values... values){
        // Logic that properly evaluates
        System.out.println(Arrays.asList(values));
        for (Values value : values) {
            // do something.
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You setup the integer values to be powers of two so that each enumerated value is a single bit in the binary representation.

int ONE = 0x1;    //0001
int TWO = 0x2;    //0010
int THREE = 0x4;  //0100
int FOUR = 0x8;   //1000

Then you use bit-wise OR to combine values and bitwise AND to test set values.

int test_value = (ONE | FOUR);   //-> 1001
bool has_one = (test_value & ONE) != 0;  //-> 1001 & 0001 -> 0001 -> true
share|improve this answer

The values you combine with | (binary OR, not logical OR [which is ||]) must not have overlapping "1"s in their bit representation. For example,

ONE = 0x1 =   0000 0001
TWO = 0x2 =   0000 0010
THREE = 0x3 = 0000 0011
FOUR = 0x4 =  0000 0100

Then you can combine ONE and TWO, for example:

ONE | TWO = 0000 0011

But you can't distinguish ONE | TWO from THREE, because there are overlapping bits. The numbers you combine should thus be powers of two, such that they don't overlap when OR'ed together. To test if a number was passed in "values", do:

if (values & ONE) {
    // ... then ONE was set
}

To better understand why and how this works, I recommend you read a bit on binary representation and logic. A good place is Chapter 3 of the Art of Assembly.

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The Java Tutorial chapter on bitwise operations are at

http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/java/nutsandbolts/op3.html

It is very concise but good for reference.

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