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Using the readLine() method of BufferedReader, can you print the first N lines of a stream in reverse order without using a list or an array?

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2  
Why? That's a dumb restriction. –  skaffman Jun 25 '11 at 20:15
    
restrictions are never dumb... –  algorithmicCoder Jun 25 '11 at 20:23
    
Well any solution must use linear space... what structures are you limiting yourself to, exactly? Can you use the call stack? The file system? Contrived problems can be interesting, but this seems vague to me. –  Daniel Jun 26 '11 at 8:55
    
Without using List or Array? Can you use a Stack? –  ninjalj Jun 26 '11 at 9:24
    
@algorithmicCoder any feedback on this one? –  maasg Jun 27 '11 at 23:18

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you can do it through recursion with something like:

void printReversed(int n)
{
   String line = reader.readLine();

   if (n > 0)
     printReversed(n-1);

   System.out.println(line);
}
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Of course, this is the kind of recursion that doesn't get optimized by tail call optimization, but since Java doesn't do tco anyway... –  ninjalj Jun 26 '11 at 9:22
    
Then, in any case, OP asked about a restriction on data structure, not on call space complexity, I don't see the purpose of splitting hairs.. especially in a language not supposed to be used with TCO ;) –  Jack Jun 26 '11 at 12:58
    
How does this work, if the readLine() does not have any clue as to what line it should be reading? Tried running this and i just got the first line printed multiple times.. –  algorithmicCoder Jul 2 '11 at 19:33
    
The reader keeps an internal state to know which line it is reading. The only think that matters is the number of times the method is called. I don't know why it keeps writing the same line, did you use the code as it is or modified something? You could try by cloning the string that is read from the reader (just to be sure): String line = new String(reader.readLine()) –  Jack Jul 2 '11 at 19:54

How about recursion to reverse the order?

Pseudo code:

reverse(int linesLeft)
   if (linesLeft == 0)
      return;
   String line = readLine();
   reverse(linesLeft - 1);
   System.out.println(line);
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2  
This will technically not use any data structures explicitly but note that we are using the call stack implicitly so for large linesLeft this may cause a stack overflow. –  zienkikk Jun 25 '11 at 20:18
    
+1 for making stack overflow actually make sense in a sentence! –  algorithmicCoder Jun 25 '11 at 20:23

Nice question. Here you have one solution based on coordinated threads. Although it's heavy on resources (1 thread/line of the buffer) it solves your problem within the given constrains. I'm curious to see other solutions.

public class ReversedBufferPrinter {

    class Worker implements Runnable {
           private final CountDownLatch trigger;
           private final CountDownLatch release;
           private final String  line;

           Worker(String line, CountDownLatch release) {
              this.trigger = new CountDownLatch(1);
              this.release = release;
              this.line = line;
           }

           public CountDownLatch getTriggerLatch() {
               return trigger;
           }

           public void run() {
              try {
                  trigger.await();
              } catch (InterruptedException ex) { } // handle 
              work();
              release.countDown();  
           }

           void work() { 
               System.out.println(line);
           }
    } 

    public void reversePrint(BufferedReader reader, int lines) throws IOException {
        CountDownLatch initialLatch = new CountDownLatch(1);
        CountDownLatch triggerLatch = initialLatch; 
        int count=0;
        String line;
        while (count++<lines && (line = reader.readLine())!=null) {
            Worker worker = new Worker(line, triggerLatch);
            triggerLatch = worker.getTriggerLatch();
            new Thread(worker).start();
        }
        triggerLatch.countDown();
        try {
            initialLatch.await();
        } catch (InterruptedException iex) {
            // handle
        }
    }

    public static void main(String [] params) throws Exception {
        if (params.length<2) { 
            System.out.println("usage: ReversedBufferPrinter <file to reverse> <#lines>");
        }
        String filename = params[0];
        int lines = Integer.parseInt(params[1]);
        File file = new File(filename);
        BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(file));
        ReversedBufferPrinter printer = new ReversedBufferPrinter();
        printer.reversePrint(reader, lines);
    }
}
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Here you have another alternative, based on BufferedReader & StringBuilder manipulations. More manageable in terms of computer resources needed.

public void reversePrint(BufferedReader bufReader, int lines) throws IOException {
    BufferedReader resultBufferReader = null;
    {
        String line;
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        int count = 0;
        while (count++<lines && (line = bufReader.readLine())!=null) {
            sb.append('\n'); // restore new line marker for BufferedReader to consume.
            sb.append(new StringBuilder(line).reverse());
        }
        resultBufferReader = new BufferedReader(new StringReader(sb.reverse().toString()));
    }
    {           
        String line;
        while ((line = resultBufferReader.readLine())!=null) {
            System.out.println(line);
        }
    }
}
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it will also require implicit data structures, but you can spawn threads, run them inorder, and make each thread read a line and wait a decreasing amount of time. the result will be: the last thread will run first, and the first one will run last, each one printing its line. (the interval between them will have to be large enough to ensure large "safety margins")

I have no idea how, if any, that can be done with no explicit/implicit data storage.

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Prepend each line you read to a string, and print the string. If you run out of lines to read, you just print what you have.

Alternatively, if you are certain of the number of lines you have, and you do not wish to use a string:

void printReversed(int n, BufferedReader reader)
{
   LineNumberReader lineReader = new LineNumberReader(reader);

   while (--i >= 0)
   {
      lineReader.setLineNumber(i); 
      System.out.println(lineReader.readLine());    
   }
}
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