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I'm using Ruby threads like this:

threads = []

for page in pages
  threads << Thread.new(page) { |myPage|

    h = Net::HTTP.new(myPage, 80)
    puts "Fetching: #{myPage}"
    resp, data = h.get('/', nil )
    puts "Got #{myPage}:  #{resp.message}"
  }
end

threads.each { |aThread|  aThread.join }

Let's say I wanted to kill all threads that are still running after a minute. How would I do this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I usually timeout my operations with Timeout:

require "timeout"
Timeout.timeout(seconds) do
 ...
end

Maybe this can help, so in your case, I think something like this should work:

begin
  Timeout.timeout(5) do
    for page in pages
      threads << Thread.new(page) { |myPage|

        h = Net::HTTP.new(myPage, 80)
        puts "Fetching: #{myPage}"
        resp, data = h.get('/', nil )
        puts "Got #{myPage}:  #{resp.message}"
      }
    end
    threads.each { |aThread|  aThread.join }
  end
rescue Timeout::Error
   # kill threads here
end 

But are you sure your controller is the best place to be doing this? Wouldn't they be better off in a background task?

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what would I wrap this around? I want to kill the threads but still render the page –  Justin Meltzer Jun 25 '11 at 23:01
    
And if the time limit expires, it's the equivalent of a kill? –  Geo Jun 25 '11 at 23:20
    
Should anything go where # kill threads here is? –  Justin Meltzer Jun 25 '11 at 23:32
    
threads.each {|t| t.kill} –  Geo Jun 25 '11 at 23:33
    
I can't stress enough that if you've gone ahead and avoided using a background task in favour of using Threads inside a controller, you're making a big mistake. –  d11wtq Jun 26 '11 at 2:48

Instead of resorting to thread management, I would simply add this line after the construction of h:

...
h = Net::HTTP.new(myPage, 80)
h.read_timeout = 60
...

That way, the HTTP request will timeout after 60 secs and the thread will exit gracefully.

EDIT: Of course, you have to check if the request was successful or did timeout. ;)

FURTHER EDIT: Let me expand your code:

threads = []

for page in pages
  threads << Thread.new(page) { |myPage|
    begin
      h = Net::HTTP.new(myPage, 80)
      h.read_timeout = 60
      puts "Fetching: #{myPage}"
      resp, data = h.get('/', nil )
      puts "Got #{myPage}:  #{resp.message}"
      # do something on a successful HTTP request.
    rescue TimeoutError => tErr
      # do something on an HTTP request that did timeout.
    end
  }
end

threads.each { |aThread|  aThread.join }
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I'm not really looking to do this –  Justin Meltzer Jun 25 '11 at 23:00
    
Well, your time-consuming operation in the thread is really the HTTP request. So, why not? –  dimitko Jun 25 '11 at 23:07

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