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I made this file to work out some confusion I had with pointers and arrays of pointers. I understand up until the commented out code, and am able to change the order of the values in p_to_pointers without changing p_to_nums. But I'm having trouble translating it to qsort.

Here is my output:

0 p_to_nums: 7 p_to_pointers: 7
1 p_to_nums: 4 p_to_pointers: 4
2 p_to_nums: 4 p_to_pointers: 4
3 p_to_nums: 2 p_to_pointers: 2
4 p_to_nums: 1 p_to_pointers: 1

This is the desired output:

0 p_to_nums: 4 p_to_pointers: 7
1 p_to_nums: 2 p_to_pointers: 4
2 p_to_nums: 7 p_to_pointers: 4
3 p_to_nums: 4 p_to_pointers: 2
4 p_to_nums: 1 p_to_pointers: 1

And my code:

int compare_values (const void *a, const void *b) {
    const int *int_a = (const int *) a;
    const int *int_b = (const int *) b;

    return (*int_b > *int_a) - (*int_b < *int_a);
}

main() {

    int i;
    int nums[5];
    int *p_to_nums;
    int *p_to_pointers[5];

    nums[0] = 4;
    nums[1] = 2;
    nums[2] = 7;
    nums[3] = 4;
    nums[4] = 1;

    p_to_nums = &nums[0];

  for (i=0; i< 5; i++) {
        p_to_pointers[i] = &p_to_nums[i];
  }

    //p_to_pointers[0] = &p_to_nums[2];
    //p_to_pointers[2] = &p_to_nums[0];

    qsort(*p_to_pointers, 5, sizeof(int), compare_values);

    for (i=0; i< 5; i++) {
        printf("%d p_to_nums: %d p_to_pointers: %u\n", i, (p_to_nums[i]), *p_to_pointers[i]);
  }

  return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Your p_to_pointers values do not point to pointers. In fact you have 1 single pointer: p_to_nums which is used to successively point to different elements of the nums array. The type of each p_to_pointer is int* (pointer to int); not int** (pointer to pointer) – pmg Jun 25 '11 at 23:39
    
@pmg: Bzzzt. Wrong answer. p_to_pointer is an array of pointers to ints, so in other words is effectively int **. – Seth Robertson Jun 25 '11 at 23:42
    
@Seth, I meant each p_to_pointer, that is to say p_to_pointer[0] etc... Other than that, the whole array, as you say, has type int**. I just find the name misleading (because it is!) – pmg Jun 26 '11 at 0:05
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are sorting *p_to_pointers with sizeof(int) whereas I believe you want to sort p_to_pointers sizeof(int *).

compare_values would need to be adjusted to dereference twice.

If…and this is a big if…I understand what you are trying to do.

Also, your comparison in compare() is needlessly complex. You can just do a simple subtraction instead of two comparisons and a subtraction.

int compare_values (const void *a, const void *b) {
  const int **int_a = (const int **) a;
  const int **int_b = (const int **) b;

  return (**int_b - **int_a);
}

main() {

  int i;
  int nums[5];
  int *p_to_nums;
  int *p_to_pointers[5];

  nums[0] = 4;
  nums[1] = 2;
  nums[2] = 7;
  nums[3] = 4;
  nums[4] = 1;

  p_to_nums = &nums[0];

  for (i=0; i< 5; i++) {
    p_to_pointers[i] = &p_to_nums[i];
    printf("%d p_to_nums: %d p_to_pointers: %u\n", i, (p_to_nums[i]), *p_to_pointers[i]);
  }

  qsort(p_to_pointers, 5, sizeof(int *), compare_values);

  for (i=0; i< 5; i++) {
    printf("%d p_to_nums: %d p_to_pointers: %u\n", i, (p_to_nums[i]), *p_to_pointers[i]);
  }

  return 0;
}

Output:

0 p_to_nums: 4 p_to_pointers: 4
1 p_to_nums: 2 p_to_pointers: 2
2 p_to_nums: 7 p_to_pointers: 7
3 p_to_nums: 4 p_to_pointers: 4
4 p_to_nums: 1 p_to_pointers: 1

0 p_to_nums: 4 p_to_pointers: 7
1 p_to_nums: 2 p_to_pointers: 4
2 p_to_nums: 7 p_to_pointers: 4
3 p_to_nums: 4 p_to_pointers: 2
4 p_to_nums: 1 p_to_pointers: 1
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, I should have read what you posted while I was writing mine, rather than finishing. You covered exactly the same ground as I did, including noting the unusual return from the compare function. +1 to you, and I deleted mine. – andrewdski Jun 25 '11 at 23:44
    
@andrewdski, I suggest undeleting yours; I thought yours had the better explanation. (Which isn't to detract from Seth's explanation in any way -- just that yours spoke better to me. :) – sarnold Jun 25 '11 at 23:46
    
Ah I wish you hadn't deleted then. :( The explanation is half the battle with where I'm at right now. Still trying to understand what this is doing.. – Jeremy Smith Jun 25 '11 at 23:49
    
@Jeremy: You are sorting the array of pointers, but you are comparing the integers the pointers point to. Going too far into pointers to pointers can make my brain hurt, so I usually try to avoid going deeply if I can avoid it. – Seth Robertson Jun 26 '11 at 1:39
    
I'll undelete it, it may be helpful. I sometimes see stack overflow as a game (I know, that is wrong), and I didn't want to "steal" upvotes from Seth. – andrewdski Jun 26 '11 at 2:40

The first argument to qsort is *p_to_pointers. That is the same as p_to_pointers[0] which you have set to &p_to_nums[0]. That, in turn is the same as p_to_nums. So you call to qsort ends up being equivalent to

qsort(p_to_nums, 5, sizeof(int), compare_values);

Thus, you are sorting p_to_nums.

What you want is

qsort(p_to_pointers, 5, sizeof(int*), compare_values);

Then your compare_values has to convert the void* to int** rather than int*, and you need an extra level of indirection in your dereferences. The usual way to accomplish the comparison would be something like this:

int compare_values (const void *a, const void *b) {
    const int **int_a = a;
    const int **int_b = b;

    return **int_b - **int_a;
}

Note that in C the casts from void* are not necessary (though in C++ they are). Also note the more typical subtraction in the return statement, rather than your rather unusual construct (though yours works).

share|improve this answer

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