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OK. Here's the deal. I've read quite a few articles on this site and others about vertical centering but they all seem to refer to centering a single div and I haven't been able to apply it correctly to a more complex layout. I'm working on a site which has a header, navigation bar, content area, sidebar, and footer. A mockup of the design can be seen here: mockup

I've got all the divs fitting together nicely thanks to the use of the 0px text trick in the container div and the content & sidebar sit next to each other using display:inline-block. the header, navbar, and footer are horizontally centered using margin-left:auto & margin-right:auto. together this nicely renders the whole site horizontally centered but I can't figure out how to apply vertical centering to the whole site without breaking the design. This is not a fluid layout, all divs have fixed pixel sizes that the content fits into very nicely. It seems that there should be some way to use absolute or relative positioning and percentages to center everything vertically but I can't figure out how to do it. The code for the mockup is attached. Thanks!

<style type="text/css">
<!--
DIV.container {
    position:relative;
    height:100%;
    width:100%;
    display:table;
    text-align:center;
    font-size:0px;
    overflow:hidden;
}
#header {
    width:650px;
    height:87px;
    z-index:1;
    background-color:#C90;
    vertical-align:middle;
    margin-left:auto;
    margin-right:auto;
    font-size:12px;
}
#navbar {
    width:650px;
    height:32px;
    z-index:2;
    background-color:#0FF;
    vertical-align:middle;
    font-size:12px;
    margin-left:auto;
    margin-right:auto;
}
#content {
    width:500px;
    height:265px;
    z-index:3;
    background-color:#33F;
    display:inline-block;
    vertical-align:middle;
    font-size:12px;
}
#sidebar {
    width:150px;
    height:265px;
    z-index:4;
    background-color:#999;
    display:inline-block;
    vertical-align:middle;
    font-size:12px;
}
#footer {
    width:650px;
    height:58px;
    z-index:5;
    background-color:#F69;
    vertical-align:middle;
    font-size:12px;
    margin-left:auto;
    margin-right:auto;
}
-->
</style>
</head>

<body>
<div class="container">
<div id="header">Header</div>
<div id="navbar">Navbar</div>
<div id="content">Content</div>
<div id="sidebar">Sidebar</div>
<div id="footer">Footer</div></div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
1  
Could you add the html? –  Kevin Bowersox Jun 26 '11 at 0:26
    
so you want to center the entire site vertically on the window? like what is it centered on? –  Thomas Shields Jun 26 '11 at 0:38
    
@kmb385 it's in there; the formatting was messed up. I fixed it. –  Thomas Shields Jun 26 '11 at 0:39
1  
What is meant by vertical alignment in this case? You want the same distance above the page layout as below it? –  kinakuta Jun 26 '11 at 0:41
    
yes, I want to center the whole site vertically so that it sits center regardless of resolution –  managerharry Jun 26 '11 at 1:10

3 Answers 3

You need to put a container around the whole part that you want vertically centered, and you need to know the height. Then you give it an absolute position that is 50% from the top and give it a margin-top of minus half the height.

So if your container is 400px high you would use the following css:

#container {
    position:    absolute;
    top:         50%;
    margin-top: -200px;
}

In your case your 'container' is 442px high, so change this css:

DIV.container {
    position:relative;
    height:100%;
    width:100%;
    display:table;
    text-align:center;
    font-size:0px;
    overflow:hidden;
}

To this:

DIV.container {
    position:absolute;
    top:50%;
    margin-top:-221px;
    width:100%;
    display:table;
    text-align:center;
    font-size:0px;
    overflow:hidden;
}
share|improve this answer
    
aha. so simple. that seems to do the trick. the only issue is that I get a bottom scroll bar after this change. –  managerharry Jun 26 '11 at 1:16
    
nevermind, the scrollbar is fixed in the demo fiddle above. must've been something else foobared. –  managerharry Jun 26 '11 at 2:14

Your stylesheet can be much cleaner/smaller.

See this demo fiddle.

And if you don't want a scroll bar when the browser window becomes small, then add overflow: hidden to the body, see this fiddle. But that's NOT a tip in the light of usability.

share|improve this answer
1  
make sure you give everything a fixed width though, like this jsfiddle.net/thomas4g/PJF5y/2, or the sidebar drops down when the screen gets small. –  Thomas Shields Jun 26 '11 at 1:01
    
@Thomas: Thanks, good tip! Though it strictly is only needed for one of header, navbar of footer. But maybe it's better to specify width for all of them. –  NGLN Jun 26 '11 at 1:11
    
yep. I'm pretty sure <IE7 chokes unless you set an explicit width on everything. oh, and +1 - i didn't realize your fiddle vertically centered it. :) –  Thomas Shields Jun 26 '11 at 1:13
    
Mmm. Thanks, that's great! Any idea how it will do in older browsers? Now I just need to adapt my actual site using the lessons learned here. –  managerharry Jun 26 '11 at 2:16
    
@managerharry This is pretty common and straight forward css, so I do think somewhat older browsers will manage it. I tested on IE7. You should not be bothered about IE6. How old do you want it to be? –  NGLN Jun 26 '11 at 2:23

And to make it dynamic, use Javascript/jQuery to find the height of the window, and adjust DIV.container's margin-top as shown by Kokos.

share|improve this answer
    
No need. The top: 50% does the trick. –  Brent Jun 26 '11 at 3:43

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