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Someone accepted a pull request which they shouldn't have. Now we have a bunch of broken code merged in. How do you undo a pull request? I was just going to revert the changes to the commit just before the merge, but I noticed that it merged in a bunch of commits. So now there are all these commits from this person from days before the merge. How do you undo this?

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Despite the advice of the accepted answer, PLEASE do not force-push to a repository if the repo is shared with anyone else. You run the risk of ruining the work others have done, and GitHub may continue to show that pull request as having been merged. Another answer to this question explains a safer way to undo a pull request. –  alxndr Jun 10 at 18:04
    
Note: at least now (June 2014), GitHub proposes "Revert" button in their Pull Request web GUI. See my answer below –  VonC Jun 27 at 19:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 68 down vote accepted

Look at your commit graph (with gitk or a similar program). You will see commits from the pull request, and you will see your own commits, and a merge commit (if it was not a fast-forward merge). You just have to find the last of your own commits before the merge, and reset the branch to this commit.

(If you have the branch's reflog, it should be even easier to find the commit before the merge.)


(Edit after more information in comments:)

Okay, lets look at the graph:

screenshot 1

I assume the last (rightmost) commit was your wrong merge by pull request, which merged the blue line seen here. Your last good commit would be the one before on the black line, here marked in red:

enter image description here

Reset to this commit, and you should be fine.

This means, in your local working copy do this (after making sure you have no more uncommitted stuff, for example by git stash):

git checkout master
git reset --hard 7a62674ba3df0853c63539175197a16122a739ef
gitk 

Now control that you are really on the commit I marked there, and you will see none of the pulled stuff in its ancestry.

git push -f origin master

(if your github remote is named origin - else change the name).

Now everything should look right on github, too. The commits will still be in your repository, but not reachable by any branch, thus should not do any harm there. (And they will be still on RogerPaladin's repository, of course.)

(There might be a Github specific web-only way of doing the same thing, but I'm not too familiar with Github and its pull request managing system.)

Note that if anyone else already might have pulled your master with the wrong commit, they then have the same problem as you currently have, and can't really contribute back. before resetting to your new master version.

If it is likely that this happened, or you simply want to avoid any problems, use the git revert command instead of git reset, to revert the changes with a new commit, instead of setting back to an older one. (Some people think you should never do reset with published branches.) See other answers to this question on how to do this.

For the future:

If you want only some of the commits of RogerPaladin's branch, consider using cherry-pick instead of merge. Or communicate to RogerPaladin to move them to a separate branch and send a new pull request.

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But we have a ton of commits between the merge and his first commit. So like we have the merge commit, our own commits and then another commit by him. It seems like it merged in really old commits of his. –  Will Jun 26 '11 at 1:53
    
Yeah, it will merge in everything that is an ancestor of the merged commit (and not already an ancestor of your commit). This should not hinder you from resetting - the commits will not be reordered by themselves, if you did not a rebase afterwards. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jun 26 '11 at 1:59
    
Well I don't really know much about git and I use tortoisegit so I don't know if you can do this with it. When I tried resetting to my last commit it still had his old commits in it. –  Will Jun 26 '11 at 2:03
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Yeah, now it looks right (apart from the strange merge into itself - but this might be a glitch in the network graph software). :-) I'm glad I could help. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jun 26 '11 at 3:19
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I think this maybe problematic if someone has pulled the bad commits and they later on send a pull request that contains the same bad commits, thus they sneak but into the repo. Would it not be safer to create a new commit that reverses the bad commits? That way if the bad commits have been pulled to other branches/forks they will be effectively removed by another pull to that other branch/fork? I'm not stating this as fact, this is what I think may be true, being in the same position as the OP and having spent an hour or so considering my options. –  Myles McDonnell Dec 17 '12 at 14:40

If the pull was the last thing he did then

git reset --hard HEAD~1
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There is a better answer to this problem, though I could just break this down step-by-step.

You will need to fetch and checkout the latest upstream changes like so, e.g.:

git fetch upstream
git checkout upstream/master -b revert/john/foo_and_bar

Taking a look at the commit log, you should find something similar to this:

commit b76a5f1f5d3b323679e466a1a1d5f93c8828b269
Merge: 9271e6e a507888
Author: Tim Tom <tim@tom.com>
Date:   Mon Apr 29 06:12:38 2013 -0700

    Merge pull request #123 from john/foo_and_bar

    Add foo and bar

commit a507888e9fcc9e08b658c0b25414d1aeb1eef45e
Author: John Doe <john@doe.com>
Date:   Mon Apr 29 12:13:29 2013 +0000

    Add bar

commit 470ee0f407198057d5cb1d6427bb8371eab6157e
Author: John Doe <john@doe.com>
Date:   Mon Apr 29 10:29:10 2013 +0000

    Add foo

Now you want to revert the entire pull request with the ability to unrevert later. To do so, you will need to take the ID of the merge commit.

In the above example the merge commit is the top one where it says "Merged pull request #123...".

Do this to revert the both changes ("Add bar" and "Add foo") and you will end up with in one commit reverting the entire pull request which you can unrevert later on and keep the history of changes clean:

git revert -m 1 b76a5f1f5d3b323679e466a1a1d5f93c8828b269
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2  
This should be the correct answer. There is a reference in the git-revert man page to more details from the git mailing list here kernel.org/pub/software/scm/git/docs/howto/… –  Justin Hamade Aug 13 at 17:36
    
Why the git checkout upstream/master -b revert/john/foo_and_bar ? what does it do exactly? –  Magne Aug 22 at 15:54
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@Magne - you are creating a new branch to do the revert in, which you can then choose where to merge the reversion. Basically just gives you more control of what to do with the branch. In my case, I submitted a new pull request from this "fixed" branch containing the reversion back to our develop branch, which means my new pull request could also be reverted if necessary. This was done for a release where we decided to pull out the first draft of a feature that was rescheduled. No bad code, just not going in this release. –  Daniel Nalbach Oct 30 at 17:55

Starting June 24th, 2014, you can try cancel a PR easily (See "Reverting a pull request") with:

Introducing the Revert Button

you can easily revert a pull request on GitHub by clicking Revert:

https://camo.githubusercontent.com/0d3350caf2bb1cba53123ffeafc00ca702b1b164/68747470733a2f2f6769746875622d696d616765732e73332e616d617a6f6e6177732e636f6d2f68656c702f70756c6c5f72657175657374732f7265766572742d70756c6c2d726571756573742d6c696e6b2e706e67

You'll be prompted to create a new pull request with the reverted changes:

https://camo.githubusercontent.com/973efae3cc2764fc1353885a6a45b9a518d9b78b/68747470733a2f2f6769746875622d696d616765732e73332e616d617a6f6e6177732e636f6d2f68656c702f70756c6c5f72657175657374732f7265766572742d70756c6c2d726571756573742d6e65772d70722e706e67

It remains to be tested though if that revert uses -m or not (for reverting merges as well)

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