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Imagine two tables (A and B):

A        B
1        2
2        3 
6        5 
4        7
9        11
         13
         23
         9 

Now I want to delete records from A that are not present in B, e.g deleting 1, 6 and 4 from A.

My initial idea is that you could 'negate' the results of a join.

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Was this homework, by the way? It kind of looks like homework but it's a little late since you got complete answers :) –  Michael Berkowski Jun 26 '11 at 1:43
    
It is not. It is for use in a hobby project. Abstractions were made for simplicity. –  abcde123483 Jun 26 '11 at 1:50
1  
Fair enough! We often ask so we don't quickly solve people's assignments for them. Cheers. –  Michael Berkowski Jun 26 '11 at 1:52
    
Nooo problem, I could see how unknowingly solving people's homework could be a pain. And thanks again for your valuable input. –  abcde123483 Jun 26 '11 at 12:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
DELETE FROM A WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM B WHERE A.id = B.id)

I've assumed that those columns are named id.

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2  
I like yours better. :) –  Chris Cunningham Jun 26 '11 at 1:39
    
Thank you, exactly what I was looking for. –  abcde123483 Jun 26 '11 at 1:51
    
had to change to DELETE FROM A WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM B WHERE A.id = B.id) –  andistuder Oct 7 '13 at 14:25
    
I edited the ON to be a WHERE as I think it should be (otherwise its not valid syntactically) –  Kristopher Ives Apr 25 '14 at 22:28

An alternative to the NOT EXISTS answer:

DELETE FROM A WHERE id NOT IN (SELECT id FROM b);

Again, assuming the column is named id.

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Very nice way of doing it as well, thank you. –  abcde123483 Jun 26 '11 at 12:13
    
It turns out I keep using your suggestion for different purposes, thank you again –  abcde123483 Jul 12 '11 at 17:41

You can find the records that are unmatched by looking for a NULL value on one side of an outer join, then delete those:

DELETE FROM A
WHERE id IN
   (
   SELECT A.id
   FROM A
   LEFT JOIN B
   ON A.id = B.id
   WHERE B.id IS NULL  -- This means we only return unmatched A records
   )

The main reason I like this is that you can run the SELECT part of the statement beforehand so that you can check your work. Otherwise the other answers look much cleaner.

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Good call on running a SELECT before a DELETE. That definitely helps avoiding a potential headache. –  abcde123483 Jun 26 '11 at 12:15
    
so all method here about multi select query, i was thinking there should be any join like solution –  Notepad Sep 6 '12 at 6:09

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