Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Are there better more performant ways to replace text then using the regex code below, specially if text is large and constantly accessed by different users. I understand performance gains may be negligible, but i'm wondering if there are better way to do it. This is what i use to replace foo with foonew

str.replace(/foo/gi, 'foonew')

Update: Text data gets retrieved from database into a textarea holder before doing word replacement. I then access textarea value, replace the words, then append updated text to body

share|improve this question
1  
"...specially if the DOM is large..." Are you doing a .replace() to modify the DOM? Something like document.body.innerHTML = document.body.innerHTML.replace(... –  user113716 Jun 26 '11 at 1:59
    
how does the access load impact you? if it's really really relevant, can't you just send the data perfected? –  leon Jun 26 '11 at 1:59
    
@patrick, i have data being retrieved from the database, before outputing to screen, I need to replace certain words. This is security related. –  Pinkie Jun 26 '11 at 2:05
1  
@leon you are missing the question. –  Pinkie Jun 26 '11 at 2:06
2  
Replacing text client-side isn't really going to help with security. Couldn't they just view source? –  icktoofay Jun 26 '11 at 2:08

2 Answers 2

Well, patric dw's comment is probably the right answer here. But let's suppose for the sake of argument that you really had to replace a random substring in some larger string, and there was no simple trick to avoid it. Here are three possibilities:

  1. If you are replacing a string with one of smaller length, then you can just shift the characters to the right over it to make up the difference. This avoids reallocating the string.

  2. If the replacement is the same size, you can just do it in place with no copying.

  3. Finally, if it is larger, you can do the string replacement lazily. Just store an object with the string you are substituting and the start/end of the segment that was replaced. This way you can avoid copying. Of course this is much more complicated than just doing the string replacement by hand, so I would probably avoid it unless the performance considerations were really dire.

share|improve this answer

Text data gets retrieved from database into a textarea holder before doing word replacement. I then access textarea value, replace the words, then append updated text to body.

The most effiecient (and most secure) way to do this is to replace the words, server-side, before ever sending the data.

Then your JS (which the user can modify!) has to do nothing but display the information.

Depending on traffic/volume, it may pay to even have sanitized versions of the text, stored in the database.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.