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What is better?

if (obj === undefined) { }


if (typeof(obj) === 'undefined') { }
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The question was related to Performance, and all answers are about the better one regardless of performance – Kousha Mar 11 at 23:57

4 Answers 4

I would go with the second one, as "undefined" is not a reserved word. Example:

var obj = undefined;
undefined = {};

if(obj === undefined) {
    console.log("undefined 1");   

if(typeof obj === 'undefined') {
    console.log("undefined 2");   

Will only show "undefined 2" because the variable undefined can be changed.

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If you somehow can't refrain from shadowing the global undefined, or can't keep from trying to reference undeclared variables, then use:

typeof x === 'undefined'

If you adhere to good coding practices, and believe in letting broken code break, use:

x === undefined

If you want a different alternative, you can use:

x === void 0;

...where void always returns undefined, and doesn't rely on the global property.

Another safeguard you can use is to use shadowing in a good way by defining a proper undefined in a function:

(function( undefined ) {

    // notice that no arguments were passed, 
    // so the `undefined` parameter will be `undefined`

    var x; 

    if( x === undefined ) {



...some people prefer to give it a different name:

(function( undef ) {

    // notice that no arguments were passed, 
    // so the `undefined` parameter will be `undefined`

    var x; 

    if( x === undef ) {


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Thorough and accurate, but I'm not sure why you'd consider "letting broken code break" a better coding practice than using something else that is guaranteed to always work and is only slightly more complicated. – Tim Down Jun 26 '11 at 9:59
@Tim Down: Well they're personal preferences, but I don't believe in coding to accommodate poor coding practices. Broken code is an excellent instructor. Also, I find the fix to be visually hideous and entirely unintuitive. I understand its purpose, but then I think that once a person understands the reasons why they need it, they should no longer need it. Just my opinions. ;o) – user113716 Jun 26 '11 at 14:17

This has been asked before, but the more common approach is to do this:

     typeof(x) == 'undefined'

See: Javascript: undefined !== undefined ?

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I use

if(typeof x==="undefined"){

Why? Because the code below isn't running on iPad.

if( x===undefined){

iOS reports an error that x is undefined. :-) You can't use undefined vars for comparison in iOS

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