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Suppose I have a Heap Like the following:

     77
    /  \
   /    \
  50    60
 / \    / \
22 30  44 55

Now, I want to insert another item 55 into this Heap.

How to do this?

Option 1.

         77
        /  \
       /    \
      55    60
     / \    / \
    50 30  44 55
   /
  22

Option 2.

     77
    /  \
   /    \
  55    60
 / \    / \
22 50  44 55
     \
     30

Option 3.

     77
    /  \
   /    \
  50    60
 / \    / \
22 30  55 55
      /
     44

Which is the correct step? And Why? Please explain.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Option 1 is right.. Because we start adding child from the most left node and if the parent is lower than the newly added child than we replace them. And like so will go on until the child got the parent having value greater than it.

Your initial tree is

     77
    /  \
   /    \
  50    60
 / \    / \
22 30  44 55

Now adding 55 according to the rule on most left side.

     77
    /  \
   /    \
  50    60
 / \    / \
22 30  44 55
/
55

But you see 22 is lower than 55 so replaced it.

       77
      /  \
     /    \
    50    60
   / \    / \
  55 30  44 55
 /
22 

Now 55 has become the child of 50 which is still lower than 55 so replace them too.

       77
      /  \
     /    \
    55    60
   / \    / \
  50 30  44 55
 /
22

Now it cant be sorted more because 77 is greater than 55 ... SO your option 1 is right.

here you can see heap sort example in detail.. This link states a heap is a specialized tree-based data structure that satisfies the heap property: if B is a child node of A, then key(A) ≥ key(B). This implies that an element with the greatest key is always in the root node, and so such a heap is sometimes called a max-heap. (Alternatively, if the comparison is reversed, the smallest element is always in the root node, which results in a min-heap.) There is no restriction as to how many children each node has in a heap, although in practice each node has at most two.

Good Luck

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Option 1, by definition binary heap's shape is a complete binary tree. The other 2 are not complete binary trees. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_heap

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True. But I can't think of any particular reason aside from convenience that any particular implementation need be limited to a strict binary heap. That being said, I can't think of any terribly persuasive arguments to use something else at the moment. –  jpm Jun 26 '11 at 4:12
    
If it is complete, you can implement it as an array. Otherwise you have to roll a full-blown tree implementation. Also a complete tree is a balanced tree. –  MK. Jun 26 '11 at 4:16
1  
You could put an incomplete heap in an array, too, it's just kinda wasteful. –  jpm Jun 26 '11 at 4:20
    
@jpm yeah I don't know wtf I was thinking when I wrote the array comment. Time to go to bed. –  MK. Jun 26 '11 at 4:24

The correct option is 1.

Why?

Remember than one property of a heap is to be a complete binary tree, i.e. all of their levels, except possibly the last, is completely filled, and all nodes are as far left as possible...wikipedia?

In options 2 and 3 the element is not inserted as far left as possible, and, therefore the property of complete binary tree is broken.

With respect to the final position of the element is by exchanging the inserted element(son) with their direct ancestor(father) while the son is less than the father.

     77
    /  \
   /    \
  50    60
 / \    / \
22 30  44 55


       77
      /  \
     /    \
    50    60
   / \    / \
  22 30  44 55
 /
55


       77
      /  \
     /    \
    50    60
   / \    / \
  55 30  44 55
 /
22


       77
      /  \
     /    \
    55    60
   / \    / \
  50 30  44 55
 /
22

I hope this be useful.

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