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Is it possible to specify the maximum number of matches to replace. For instance if matching 'l' in "Hello World", would it be possible to replace the first 2 'l' characters, but not the third without looping?

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you can with python re.sub(repl, string[, count=0]), but this, obviously, is not what you are after. –  matchew Jun 26 '11 at 5:21
    
It might be the motivation needed to trade up to Python. –  Quick Joe Smith Jun 26 '11 at 6:17
1  
@Quick: Up? Surely, you mean down. –  TLP Jun 26 '11 at 9:16
1  
I like writing Perl, but I don't especially enjoy reading it back. –  Quick Joe Smith Jun 26 '11 at 9:32
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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted
$str = "Hello world!";
$str =~ s/l/r/ for (1,2);
print $str;

I don't see what's so bad about looping.

Actually, here's a way:

$str="Hello world!"; 
$str =~ s/l/$i++ >= 2 ? "l": "r"/eg; 
print $str;

It's a loop, of sorts, since s///g works in a loopy way when you do this. But not a traditional loop.

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How is the latter way "loopy"? It just traverses the string once, right? –  Tim N Jun 26 '11 at 10:42
    
@Tim Nordenfur: It evals each time it finds a match, but yes, only goes through the string once. You could do while (/match/g) to create a loop. –  TLP Jun 26 '11 at 12:16
    
Every method is a loop. There are explicit loops (the ones that look like 'while' or 'foreach', and implicit loops (the ones that don't have a name but occur behind the scenes.) There's no traversal (even once) without an implicit loop. It's just hidden in the /g clause of the RE engine. –  DavidO Jun 26 '11 at 14:51
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Here is one way. This requires an external counter to be updated within the RE using a (?{code}) block inside of a (?(condition)true-sub-expression|false-sub-expression) construct. See perldoc perlre for an explanation.

use Modern::Perl;
use re qw/eval/; # Considered experimental.

my $string = 'Hello world!';

my $count = 2;

my $re =    qr/
                (l)
                (?(?{$count--})|(*FAIL))
            /x;

say "Looking for $count instances of 'l' in $string.";
my ( @found ) = $string =~ m/$re/g;
say "Found ", scalar @found, " instances of 'l': @found";

The output is:

Looking for 2 instances of 'l' in Hello world!
Found 2 instances of 'l': l l

Here's another test of the same regexp, but this time we're keeping track of the position of the matches just to prove it's matching the first two occurrences.

use Modern::Perl;
use strict;
use warnings;
use re qw/eval/; # Considered experimental.

my $string = 'Hello world!';

my $count = 2;
my $position = 0;

my $re =    qr/
                (l)(?{$position=pos})
                (?(?{$count--})|(*FAIL))
            /x;

while( $string =~ m/$re/g ) {
    say "Found $1 at ", $position;
}

And this time the output is:

Found l at 3
Found l at 4

I don't think I would recommend any of this. If I were considering constraining matches to only one portion of a string, I would match against a substr() of the string. But if you like to live on the edge, go ahead and have fun with this snippet.

Here it is in a substitution:

use Modern::Perl;
use strict;
use warnings;
use re qw/eval/; # Considered experimental.

my $string = 'Hello world!';
say "Before substitution $string";
my $count = 2;
my $re =    qr/
                (l)
                (?(?{$count--})|(*FAIL))
            /x;

 $string =~ s/$re/L/g;

 say "After substitution  $string";

And the output:

Before substitution Hello world!
After substitution  HeLLo world!
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One note: I really wanted to run this through YAPE::Regex::Explain to show what was happening, but unfortunately it wasn't producing an accurate description of what is going on. –  DavidO Jun 26 '11 at 6:51
    
Another comment, if anyone's still reading: Any method that involves a counter embedded within the regexp itself is probably going to be sensitive to backtracking by the RE engine. Just a thought. –  DavidO Jun 28 '11 at 19:03
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Short answer: no. You will need to perform the substitutions in a loop of some kind.

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2  
@re = qw(l l); s/(l)/shift @re || $1/eg; –  TLP Jun 26 '11 at 10:31
    
That's cute, but its utility is somewhat limited to only the most trivial of regex patterns. The version you posted in your answer is much more useful. –  Quick Joe Smith Jun 27 '11 at 13:27
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