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I am trying to take a list of lists, and return a list of lists which contain each element at an index of the original list of lists. I know that that's badly worded. Here's an example.

Say I have the following list of lists:

[[1,2,3], [4,5,6], [7,8,9]]

I want to get another list of lists, in which each list is a list of each elements at a specific index. For example:

[[1,2,3], [4,5,6], [7,8,9]] becomes [[1,4,7], [2,5,8], [3,6,9]]

So the first list in the returned list, contains all of the elements at the first index of each of the original list, and so on. I'm stuck, and have no idea how this could be done. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

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2  
FYI: That's commonly called transposing or rotating. –  delnan Jun 26 '11 at 9:24
    
@delnan: I'd rather not call it rotating. IMO rotating is mylist = mylist[1:] + mylist[:1] (left) or mylist = mylist[-1:] + mylist[:-1] (right). –  pillmuncher Jun 26 '11 at 19:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted
>>> [list(t) for t in zip(*[[1,2,3], [4,5,6], [7,8,9]])]
[[1, 4, 7], [2, 5, 8], [3, 6, 9]]
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I feel really stupid, having missed a built-in that does exactly that. In my defense, I've never had to use something like it before. Thanks though! –  Michael Smith Jun 26 '11 at 9:51

perhaps an easy way wiould be:

a=[[1,2,3], [4,5,6], [7,8,9]]
b=zip(*a)

b will be equal to [(1, 4, 7), (2, 5, 8), (3, 6, 9)]. hopes this helps

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N.B: This list contains tuples, rather than lists in Python 2.x and a zip object in Python 3.x. This is probably okay, but worth noting. –  Johnsyweb Jun 26 '11 at 9:38
1  
yes, and this is perhaps sufficient. Dan D. solution is already giving the complete solution with lists. Your solution is also nice using arrays, thank you. –  fransua Jun 26 '11 at 9:56

Dan D's answer is correct and will work in Python 2.x and Python 3.x.

If you're doing lots of matrix operations, not just transposition, it's worth considering Numpy at this juncture:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> x = np.array([[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]])
>>> np.swapaxes(x, 0, 1)
array([[1, 4, 7],
       [2, 5, 8],
       [3, 6, 9]])

Or, more simply, as per the comments, use numpy.transpose():

>>> np.transpose(x)
array([[1, 4, 7],
       [2, 5, 8],
       [3, 6, 9]])
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1  
Why not just transpose? –  katrielalex Jun 26 '11 at 12:29
    
@katrielalex: Because I forgot it was there! Thanks for the reminder. –  Johnsyweb Jun 26 '11 at 21:46

In addition to the zip(*lists) approach, you could also use a list comprehension:

[[l[i] for l in lists] for i in range(3)]
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Or [[l[i] for l in lists] for i in range(len(lists))] to remove the hard-coded three. –  Johnsyweb Jun 26 '11 at 9:40

In case you want to simply transpose your matrix -e.g. to get new matrix where rows are cols from initial matrix while columns equal to the initial matrix rows values then you can use:

initMatr = [
            [1,2,3],
            [4,5,6],
            [7,8,9]
           ]
map(list, zip(*initMatr))


>>> [
     [1,4,7],
     [2,5,8],
     [3,6,9]
    ]

OR in case you want to rotate matrix left then:

map(list, zip(*map(lambda x: x[::-1], initMatr)

>>> [
       [3,6,9],
       [2,5,8],
       [1,4,7]       
    ]
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