Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a PHP-script displaying random text:

<?php

$quotes = array(
        'quote 1',
        'quote 2',
        'quote 3',
        'quote 4',
        'quote 5',
);

$i = array_rand($quotes);

header('Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8');
print($quotes[$i]);

?>

How could I call it every minute to display a new quote (Russian text in UTF8 encoding) at my web page (which itself is an iframe app at Facebook)?

Do I need to use jQuery here or is there a lighter solution, working in the usual browsers?

I don't have any AJAX experience yet.

UPDATE:

As suggested by Uku Loskit below, I've added the following snippet and it works well. Can anybody please show me how to fade the new quote in with fadeIn()?

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.6/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
$(function() {
        setTimeout( function() {
                $.get("/hint.php", function(data) {
                        $("#hint").html(data);
                });
        }, 5*60*1000 );
});
</script>

Thank you! Alex

share|improve this question
    
check my new edit –  Uku Loskit Jun 26 '11 at 16:09
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

use the setTimeout() method.

I'd say there's nothing heavy about using jQuery (especially the minified version) "just for AJAX", because it provides a cross-browser compatible solution and is much easier to program.

example:

function getNewQuotes() {
   $.get("random_quotes.php", function(data) {
       // set the response from random_quotes.php to this div
       $("#quotesDiv").html(data);
   }); 
}

// 60000 milliseconds = 60 seconds = 1 minute
var t=setTimeout("getNewQuotes()", 60000);

As for your question of mixing "non-JQuery and Javascript", there's no jQuery function for this that I know of, all-in-all jQuery is still Javascript and relying on jQuery specific code all the time isn't necessary, but would be only be useful for consistency.

Edit:

$(function() {
            setTimeout( function() {
                    $.get("/hint.php", function(data) {
                            // first hide, then insert contents
                            $("#hint").hide();
                            $("#hint").html(data);
                            // you can probably chain this together into one command as well
                            $("#hint").fadeIn("slow");

                    });
            }, 5*60*1000 );
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I understand how to call setTimeout, but how do I do the AJAX call to the quote.php? –  Alexander Farber Jun 26 '11 at 9:46
    
Thank you, this works and I've updated the question. Can you please help me with the fadeIn() as the final touch? :-) –  Alexander Farber Jun 26 '11 at 15:36
    
Thanks and I've ended up using setInterval. –  Alexander Farber Jun 26 '11 at 16:58
add comment

You don't need jquery, but its easier like that. Just pick up from the manual Basic example of how to get it once:

$.ajax({
  url: "yourFileName.php",
  context: document.body,
  success: function(result){
    $('#someDiv').html('result');
  }
});

then add the javascript code to do this periodically. I'm sure you could find something nifty from the jquery thingymabob too :)

share|improve this answer
    
jQuery.ajax() doesn't have any "timer" argument, how could I enforce it being called every minute please? –  Alexander Farber Jun 26 '11 at 9:44
    
use the setTimer for instance that @uku mentioned? –  Nanne Jun 26 '11 at 9:47
    
And what format/data should the script called by jQuery.ajax() print? Should it be text/plain or text/html? And should I print the <html> and <body> or just <p>my quote</p>? –  Alexander Farber Jun 26 '11 at 9:47
    
Nanne, wouldn't that be a mix of jQuery with non-jQuery? Is there maybe a jQuery way for calling jQuery.ajax() periodically? –  Alexander Farber Jun 26 '11 at 9:49
    
Also I'm confused by context: document.body - will that replace the complete web page? –  Alexander Farber Jun 26 '11 at 9:50
show 2 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.