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I want to be able to perform an avg() on a column after removing the 5 highest values in it and see that the stddev is not above a certain number. This has to be done entirely as a PL/SQL query.

EDIT: To clarify, I have a data set that contains values in a certain range and tracks latency. I want to know whether the AVG() of those values is due to a general rise in latency, or due to a few values with a very high stddev. I.e - (1, 2, 1, 3, 12311) as opposed to (122, 124, 111, 212). I also need to achieve this via an SQL query due to our monitoring software's limitations.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can use row_number to find the top 5 values, and filter them out in a where clause:

select  avg(col1)
from    (
        select  row_number() over (order by col1 desc) as rn
        ,       *
        from    YourTable
        ) as SubQueryAlias
where   rn > 5
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I don't need to remove the top/bottom 5 rows from my data set. I need to remove the top 5 MAX() values. I.e - If my data set contains (111, 123, 1231, 15151, 12311, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 1....) I want to perform an AVG() that returns the results of the single digits. –  Arkadi Y. Jun 26 '11 at 11:35
3  
@Arkadi: His query does that. Note the order by. –  Peter Alexander Jun 26 '11 at 11:37
    
Hmm. What I seem to be missing is what the over keyword exactly does. A quick google doesn't return much, except that it relates to partitioning your results, which seems very relevant. I'll try and look into that. –  Arkadi Y. Jun 26 '11 at 11:59
    
@Arkadi: This is called an analytic function. Documentation here: download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14200/… –  Dave Costa Jun 26 '11 at 14:00
    
This version will remove 5 rows with the highest value, not the 5 highest values. The difference is that if you have the same value more that once, each time it is removed will count as one removal. If you change row_number to dense_rank, the five highest values will be removed, no matter how many times they occur. –  Allan Jun 27 '11 at 13:53
select column_name1 from 
(
  select column_name1 from table_name order by nvl(column_name,0) desc
)a 
where rownum<6 

(the nvl is done to omit the null value if there is/are any in the column column_name)

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Well, the most efficient way to do it would be to calculate (sum(all values) - sum(top 5 values)) / (row_count - 5)

SELECT SUM(val) AS top5sum FROM table ORDER BY val DESC LIMIT 5

SELECT SUM(val) AS allsum FROM table

SELECT (COUNT(*) - 5) AS bottomCount FROM table

The average is then (allsum - top5sum) / bottomCount

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3  
LIMIT is not available in Oracle –  Dave Costa Jun 26 '11 at 14:01

First, get the MAX 5 values:

SELECT TOP 5 RowId FROM Table ORDER BY Column

Now use this in your main statement:

SELECT AVG(Column) FROM Table WHERE RowId NOT IN (SELECT TOP 5 RowId FROM Table ORDER BY Column)
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5  
TOP is not available in Oracle –  Dave Costa Jun 26 '11 at 14:00
    
In Oracle, TOP is replaced by LIMIT. –  Andrew Lazarus Jun 26 '11 at 21:22
4  
Oracle doesn't have TOP or LIMIT –  Gary Myers Jun 26 '11 at 22:32

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