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Problem with font-size (line-height) affecting <img ... > elements

(at least in webkit / safari) It seems that extra space is applied under elements according to the font-size / line-height that affects the parent container.

in this example, the outer div is larger than the image (space is added under the image):

<div class="outer">
    <img src="http://placehold.it/300x100" width="300" height="100">
</div>

but in this example no space is added:

<div class="outer">
    <div style="width:300px; height:100px">
</div>

The bigger the font-size(line-height) on the outer div, the larger the space added. So the following CSS will fix the problem (but isn't a useful fix really):

.outer{
    line-height: 0;
}

See a full demonstration of the problem here: http://jsfiddle.net/mikkelbreum/wtKS2/

I'm sure this is a known 'problem', but I couldn't find a good treatment of the problem from my googling..

I would like to hear from others, if this is a well known problem (why would an image be treated as a text block with regards to line-height being added below it.) And is there an agreed upon way to handle this problem?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A way to solve it is adding the CSS property vertical-align:middle; or vertical-align:text-bottom; to the <img>. This will remove the space under the image.

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thanks, is this compatible in all browsers? –  mikkelbreum Jun 26 '11 at 13:05
    
I ended up with adding a custom class (.display-block) to all images that I know I need to not be affected by parent's line-height, and then defining display:block for that class. –  mikkelbreum Jun 26 '11 at 13:06
    
AFAIK it's compatible with all browsers. –  Floern Jun 26 '11 at 13:10
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