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I have a text file which always has one line, how could I set a string for the first line of the text file in C#?

e.g. line1 in test.txt = string version

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
File.WriteAllLines("c:\\test.txt", new[]{"myString"});

To read a textfile with only one line into a variable

var str = File.ReadAllText("c:\\test.txt");
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Forgive me but, shouldnt it be ReadAllLines? –  James Buttler Jun 26 '11 at 13:37
    
From your question "how could I set a string for the first line of the text file" I assumed you wanted to "set" the string to the text file. –  Magnus Jun 26 '11 at 13:40
    
Sorry, no, I wanted it the other way around –  James Buttler Jun 26 '11 at 13:41
    
Ok, I've updated the answer. –  Magnus Jun 26 '11 at 13:42
    
Thank you very much –  James Buttler Jun 26 '11 at 13:45

A text file is not line based, so you can't change a specific line in a text file, you would need to rewrite the entire file.

If your file only ever contains that single line, you can just rewrite the file with the new string:

File.WriteAllText(fileName, newValue);

Edit:

As you said that what you actually want to do is to read the file, it's different... If there is only a single line in the file, you can read the entire file:

string line = File.ReadAllText(fileName);

If the file could contain more than a single line, you would have to open the file and only read the first line:

string line;
using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(fileName)) {
  line = reader.ReadLine();
}

You could also use File.ReadAllLines and get the first line from the result, but that would be wasteful if the file contains a lot of lines.

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Have a look at the File class.

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