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void foo (const std::string &s) {}

int main() {
  foo(0);   //compiles, but invariably causes runtime error
  return 0;
}

The compiler (g++ 4.4) apparently interprets 0 as char* NULL, and constructs s by calling string::string(const char*, const Allocator &a = Allocator()). Which is of course useless, because the NULL pointer is not a valid pointer to a c-string. This misinterpretation does not arise when I try to call foo(1), this helpfully produces a compile-time error.

Is there any possibility to get such an error or warning at compile-time when I accidentally call a function like

void bar(const std::string &s, int i=1);

with bar(0), forgetting about the string, and actually meaning to have i=0?

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3  
Not really without some help from the compiler. Some implementations have added a private basic_string(int) to catch this case. If not, I guess you are out of luck. –  Bo Persson Jun 26 '11 at 14:01
    
I'm surprised that this pass gcc, it's known for its ugly errors/warnings, but I would have expected something here. Did you crank up the warning level ? –  Matthieu M. Jun 26 '11 at 16:00
    
@Matthieu I could not find any options that give me a warning, but I'm not really into gcc warning options. -W -Wall -Wpointer-arith -Wcast-qual does not do the trick, at any rate. –  leftaroundabout Jun 27 '11 at 9:03
    
I tested with clang (using gcc headers), and it didn't trigger any warning either :( –  Matthieu M. Jun 27 '11 at 9:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

This is kind of ugly, but you could create a template that will produce an error when instantiated:

template <typename T>
void bar(T const&)
{
    T::youHaveCalledBarWithSomethingThatIsntAStringYouIdiot();
}

void bar(std::string const& s, int i = 1)
{
    // Normal implementation
}

void bar(char const* s, int i = 1)
{
    bar(std::string(s), i);
}

Then using it:

bar(0); // produces compile time error
bar("Hello, world!"); // fine
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5  
+1 even though this approach fails if T actually has a public static method called youHaveCalledBarWithSomethingThatIsntAStringYouIdiot and takes no arguments ;) –  Björn Pollex Jun 26 '11 at 14:26

One somewhat clean workaround...

#include <cassert>

void foo (const std::string &s)
{
    // Your function
}

void foo(const char *s)
{
     assert(s != 0);
     foo(std::string(s));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Except this is run-time, not compile-time. –  robert Jun 26 '11 at 14:19
    
@robert I know, it's just one possible solution. –  Paul Manta Jun 26 '11 at 14:21

Actually static asserts would work too. consider this:

void foo (const std::string &s)
{
    // Your function
}

void foo(const char *s)
{
    #ifdef CPP_OH_X
    static_assert(s == 0, "Cannot pass 0 as an argument to foo!");
    #else
    typedef int[(s != 0) ? 1 : -1] check;
    #endif
    foo(std::string(s));
}

The idea here is to use static_assert which is a upcoming feature in C++ and is already implemented in various compilers; primarly the ones that support C++0x. Now if you're not using C++0x you can use the alternitive method, which basicly typedefs an integer with a negitive value on failure. Something which is not allowed and will produce an error at compile time

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This certainly looks cleaner than the template hack, but it does not seem to work: implctstringparam.cpp: In function ‘void foo(const char*)’: implctstringparam.cpp:9: error: ‘s’ cannot appear in a constant-expression –  leftaroundabout Jun 27 '11 at 8:42
    
The const std::string& s would most likely need to be static inorder for static assertion to work. –  graphitemaster Mar 2 '12 at 16:35
1  
The value of s is only known at runtime, when the function is called: you cannot use it in a static_assert, which is evaluated at compile-time. A static_assert can only evaluate constant expressions. –  James McNellis Jul 31 '12 at 22:28

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