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How would you write (in C/C++) a macro which tests if an integer type (given as a parameter) is signed or unsigned?


      #define is_this_type_signed (my_type) ...

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1  
C and C++ are two different but related languages. You want to bear this in mind--macros are a great solution in C but they're dangerous and mostly unneeded in C++. Macros completely short-circuit the type checking in C++, just for starters. –  Onorio Catenacci Sep 15 '08 at 17:21
1  
There are certain things you can't do without macros. Anyway, some C/C++ code is necessary if you want to do something similar in a C++ template. –  botismarius Sep 15 '08 at 17:23
    
Can you please explain what "certain things" can't be done without macros? –  Billy ONeal Oct 12 '10 at 17:52
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10 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

If what you want is a simple macro, this should do the trick:

#define is_type_signed(my_type) (((my_type)-1) < 0)
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This answer has an unitialized variable; this may not always work. Need to change to: #define is_type_signed(my_type) (((my_type(0))-1) < 0) –  Patrick Johnmeyer Sep 15 '08 at 18:07
    
Patrick J: In C++, the original works fine due to default initialization. You're right in C, though. –  Branan Sep 18 '08 at 16:47
6  
How can there be an uninitialized variable when the only variables are the temporaries 0 and -1? –  Greg Rogers Sep 18 '08 at 19:53
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In C++, use std::numeric_limits<type>::is_signed.

#include <limits>
std::numeric_limits<int>::is_signed  - returns true
std::numeric_limits<unsigned int>::is_signed  - returns false

See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/85084kd6(VS.80).aspx.

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Not technically a "macro" as requested, but certainly the most standard method for a built-in type. –  Patrick Johnmeyer Sep 15 '08 at 17:57
1  
Agreed, but macros should be avoided as much as possible in C++ IMO. –  ChrisN Sep 15 '08 at 18:30
    
Agreed, I voted your answer up -- merely contrasting it to the current accepted answer. –  Patrick Johnmeyer Sep 15 '08 at 19:59
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In C++ you can do:


bool is_signed = std::numeric_limits<typeof(some_integer_variable)>::is_signed;

numeric_limits is defined in the <limits> header.

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There's no such thing as typeof() in C++. But in C++11 there is decltype(variable), that does the thing. –  mcv Oct 11 '13 at 22:50
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Your requirement isn't exactly the best, but if you'd like to hack together a define, one option could be:

#define is_numeric_type_signed(typ) ( (((typ)0 - (typ)1)<(typ)0) && (((typ)0 - (typ)1) < (typ)1) )

However, this isn't considered nice or portable by any means.

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I was actually just wondering the same thing earlier today. The following seems to work:

#define is_signed(t)    ( ((t)-1) < 0 )

I tested with:

#include <stdio.h>

#define is_signed(t)    ( ((t)-1) < 0 )
#define psigned(t) printf( #t " is %s\n", is_signed(t) ? "signed" : "unsigned" );

int
main(void)
{
    psigned( int );
    psigned( unsigned int );
}

which prints:

int is signed
unsigned int is unsigned
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If you want a macro then this should do the trick:

#define IS_SIGNED( T ) (((T)-1)<0)

Basically, cast -1 to your type and see if it's still -1. In C++ you don't need a macro. Just #include <limits> and:

bool my_type_is_signed = std::numeric_limits<my_type>::is_signed;
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Althout typeof is not legal C++ at the moment, you can use template deduction instead. See sample code below:

#include <iostream>
#include <limits>

template <typename T>
bool is_signed(const T& t)
{
  return std::numeric_limits<T>::is_signed;
}

int main()
{
  std::cout << 
    is_signed(1) << " " << 
    is_signed((unsigned char) 0) << " " << 
    is_signed((signed char) 0) << std::endl;
}

This code will print

  1 0 1
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For c++, there is boost::is_unsigned<T>. I'm curious why you need it though, there are few good reasons IMHO.

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I need to compute the maximum and the minimum value for an integer type variable, given it's type. –  botismarius Sep 15 '08 at 17:28
    
You can use std::numeric_limits<>::max() and std::numeric_limits<>::min() to obtain the maximum and minimum values for a type. –  ChrisN Sep 15 '08 at 17:32
1  
If you wanted that, why didn't you ask that in the first place? –  Leon Timmermans Sep 15 '08 at 17:33
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You could do this better with a template function, less macro nasty business.

    template <typename T>
        bool IsSignedType()
        {
           // A lot of assumptions on T here
           T instanceAsOne = 1;

           if (-instanceAsOne > 0)
           {
               return true;
           }
           else
           {
               return false;
           }
}

Forgive the formatting...

I would try this out and see if it works...

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In C, you can't write a macro that works on as-yet unknown typedef's of fundamental integer types.

In C++, you can as long as your type is a fundamental integer type or a typedef of a fundamental integer type. Here's what you'd do in C++:

template <typename T>
struct is_signed_integer
{
    static const bool value = false;
};

template <>
struct is_signed_integer<int>
{
    static const bool value = true;
};

template <>
struct is_signed_integer<short>
{
    static const bool value = true;
};

template <>
struct is_signed_integer<signed char>
{
    static const bool value = true;
};

template <>
struct is_signed_integer<long>
{
    static const bool value = true;
};

// assuming your C++ compiler supports 'long long'...
template <>
struct is_signed_integer<long long>
{
    static const bool value = true;
};

#define is_this_type_signed(my_type) is_signed_integer<my_type>::value
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