Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to use a byte variable i to execute a bit of code 256 times. The line below loops indefinitely, is there a tidy alternative that would work?

for (i = 0; i < 255; i++){

Hopefully without using:

  • a 16 bit variable, (or any extra bits at all)
  • nested loops
  • while(1)
  • break; statements

Thanks

share|improve this question
2  
Why on earth would it loop infinitely? –  Armen Tsirunyan Jun 26 '11 at 16:33
3  
Because i never reaches 256, since it's an 8 bit unsigned –  Jodes Jun 26 '11 at 16:34
1  
@Armen It reaches 255 and switches back to 0 –  Ryan Amos Jun 26 '11 at 16:35
5  
@Jodes: is i is unsigned 8bit, its max value is 255. The above will not go in an infinite loop. (But it will only loop 255 times). –  Mat Jun 26 '11 at 16:35
2  
@Jodes: If you have unusual requirements because you're using an unusual platform, I'd suggest drawing attention to it in the question. All these people who are saying "just use an int" might have paused for thought if it had been clear from the start that you were building for an 8-bit microcontroller (where I can well believe that you might get smaller/faster code by using an 8-bit type)... –  Matthew Slattery Jun 26 '11 at 19:26

8 Answers 8

up vote 8 down vote accepted
i = 0;
do {
  f(i);
} while(i++!=255);
share|improve this answer

Could always do this:

for (i = 0; i != 255; ++i)
{
    f(i);
}
f(255);

Honestly though, you'd be best just using an int. It's not going to be faster if you use an 8-bit integer. It's going to be in a register anyway.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1. If you really want to do this and must avoid a bigger datatype for the index. –  Skurmedel Jun 26 '11 at 16:39
    
What if the target machine has a 4-bits processor? –  user142019 Jun 26 '11 at 16:45
1  
The C language requires int to have a range of at least 16 bits. –  R.. Jun 26 '11 at 17:15
1  
@WTP What if the target machine is an abacus? –  David Heffernan Jun 26 '11 at 18:17
1  
@WTP An Abacus Computer is Turing complete. –  David Heffernan Jun 26 '11 at 18:25
uint8_t i = 0;
do {
    ...
} while ((++i) != 0);

Of course the assumption is that i will overflow. That's not guaranteed by C standard, yet almost always happen when the compiler does not optimize too heavily.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice solution! Much better than mine :/ +1 –  Ryan Amos Jun 26 '11 at 16:41
2  
arithmetic with unsigned types is very well defined by the standard: it works modulus (MAX_FOR_TYPE + 1). Your solution works as is. –  pmg Jun 26 '11 at 16:51
    
@pmg, Ha, yes, I checked now. I thought this restriction applies to both unsigned and signed math. Thanks for comment! –  liori Jul 1 '11 at 18:17

I would say unrolling the loop would be the most obvious way out of this one:

uint8_t i = 0;
for ( i = 0; i < 32; i++ )
{
    printf("Instance of loop %d\n", (8*i)+0);
    printf("Instance of loop %d\n", (8*i)+1);
    printf("Instance of loop %d\n", (8*i)+2);
    printf("Instance of loop %d\n", (8*i)+3);
    printf("Instance of loop %d\n", (8*i)+4);
    printf("Instance of loop %d\n", (8*i)+5);
    printf("Instance of loop %d\n", (8*i)+6);
    printf("Instance of loop %d\n", (8*i)+7);
}

In theory, this should also be quicker, since you have fewer tests and jumps. You could unroll more severely than this too, if needed.

You may also be interested in Duff's device (SO question explaining it), which would allow you to unroll any sized loop, not just one with nice factors. There are of course limits as it requires you store in memory the count of what you need, which in this case exceeds the 8-bit field, but, for the purposes of looping, say 137 times, it would come in useful.

Note you don't need to do the 8*i+1 stages, that's just to verify that enough events have happened.

Another note: "but I don't want to write my code 8 times!" can be overcome with the use of inline functions (C99) or macros (C89) as necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
Since the OP seems concerned with micro-optimization, you might be able to change the loop to += 8 and avoid 8 multiplies. –  Chris Lutz Jun 26 '11 at 19:55
    
@Chris the problem with += 8 is that the last iteration falls on 256 which you can't represent with a uint8_t. You'd have to start using two variables (one to count, one to increment by 8 to avoid multiplication) - it depends on which costs most at that stage. I'm slightly assuming the OP doesn't actually need to know the loop number, but rather just execute the code 256 times. –  Ninefingers Jun 26 '11 at 20:01

If "byte" is char it will always be <255 on systems where char is signed (and 8 bits). If you must use a "byte" type, try unsigned char, which should work for your loop.

If it is not just an experiment, use int instead.

share|improve this answer

The only way I can think of would be to have a boolean

b = 1;
for(i = 0; i != 0 || b; i++)
{
    b = 0;
    ...
}

Or you could use a short instead, which is 2x the size of a byte.

What's happening is that the maximum unsigned byte value is 255. I'm not sure what happens with unsigned bytes, but signed bytes become negative when you overflow.

share|improve this answer

It will in general be quickest to declare i as an int. I can't imagine why you want to loop with an 8 bit integer. Perhaps you think it will be quicker than int but it won't.

share|improve this answer
1  
and the downvote is for what exactly? –  David Heffernan Jun 26 '11 at 16:42

EDIT: I get it wrong, it loops 255 times... :) A do-while construct is better:

  i = 0;
  do {
     // act
     i++;
  } while(i > 0);

The following two snippets loop 255 times, from 1 to 255.

  for(i = 1; i <= 255 && i != 0; i++)

should go. Or maybe

   for(i = 1; i > 0; i++)
share|improve this answer
    
But yes of course David Heffernan is right: on modern systems it is more natural for cpus to handle "int" rather than "char". –  ShinTakezou Jun 26 '11 at 16:38
    
We're not supposed to use char or int or short or any of that. Just byte. –  Ryan Amos Jun 26 '11 at 16:40
    
C has no byte, just char (char == byte likely); I've fixed the ans, since the old one looped 255 times (1-255); of course i must be unsigned char, otherwise this will loop a lot longer –  ShinTakezou Jun 26 '11 at 16:43
    
Ah, I'm a Java noob, so I wouldn't know. I've only looked at C and done some C++ –  Ryan Amos Jun 26 '11 at 16:50
    
in the second and third solution, it is enough you add a loner iteration before entering the loop, as suggested in another solution: f(0); /* for loops with f(i) body */. –  ShinTakezou Jun 26 '11 at 16:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.