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In a Windows XP batch file, I'm grabbing an FTP directory list and processing it with a For /F loop. The last token containing the file name ends up with a carriage return (0D) as the last character in the variable. Once retrieved, my attempt to use the value in the token fails because the carriage return causes my If statement to wrap to the beginning of the line.

@echo off
for /f "tokens=1,4 delims=" %%A in ('ftp -s:dir.ftp') do (
   if 'Stuff.zip'=='%%B' Set StuffDate=%%A
   )
echo Stuff.zip was saved on %StuffDate%.

The content to be processed is as follows:

ftp> dir
200 PORT command successful.
150 Opening ASCII mode data connection for /bin/ls.
01-04-10  10:00AM                93882 Logo.jpg
02-05-10  11:01PM       <DIR>          PCODE
03-06-10  12:02PM             42333443 Saved stuff.zip
04-07-10  12:42PM             49343848 Stuff.zip
226 Transfer complete.

Upon examination with a hex editor, each line ends with 0D 0D 0A, instead of just 0D 0A. I'm not sure why the extra 0D is there, but I need to remove it for my program to function.

During execution when the %%B equals Stuff.zip, the If should look like this:

( if 'Stuff.zip'=='Stuff.zip' Set ReleaseDate=04-07-10 ) 

The If line ends up looking like this because of the CR:

' Set ReleaseDate=04-07-10 )  'Stuff.zip

The ( if 'Stuff.zip'=='Stuff.zip gets overwritten as the 0D carriage return gets processed.

How can I get rid of an extra 0D at the end of an environment variable?

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1 Answer 1

Even if your code line looks curious, it works normally.
But in your case there is multiple ways to remove the <CR>.

First and simplest way - Use the batch parser, as the parser removes all <CR> characters after the percent expansion phase and before the special character phase.

@echo off
setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion
for /f "tokens=1,4 delims=" %%A in ('ftp -s:dir.ftp') do (
   set "fileName=%%B"
   call :removeCR
   if 'Stuff.zip'=='!fileName!' Set StuffDate=%%A
   )
echo Stuff.zip was saved on %StuffDate%.
goto :eof

:removeCR
set "fileName=%fileName%"
goto :eof

But generally this solution could cause some problems with special characters, like exclamation marks quotes and so on.

The other way is to replace the <CR> with an empty string.

@echo off
setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion
for /f "tokens=1,4 delims=" %%A in ('ftp -s:dir.ftp') do (
   set "fileName=%%B"
   call :removeCR
   if 'Stuff.zip'=='!fileName!' Set StuffDate=%%A
   )
echo Stuff.zip was saved on %StuffDate%.

:removeCR
set "fileName=%fileName:<CR>=%"
goto :eof

The <CR> in the line set "fileName=%fileName:<CR>=%" has to be changed to 0x0D with a hex-editor. But this solution has the same special character problems like the first solution, and you can't create it with a normal text editor.

The last solution creates a single <CR> and uses it in the :removeCR function with delayed expansion.
This solution is safe against all special characters except exclamation marks.

@echo off
setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion
for /f %%a in ('copy /Z "%~dpf0" nul') do set "CR=%%a"

for /f "tokens=1,4 delims=" %%A in ('ftp -s:dir.ftp') do (
   set "fileName=%%B"
   call :removeCR
   if 'Stuff.zip'=='!fileName!' Set StuffDate=%%A
   )
echo Stuff.zip was saved on %StuffDate%.

:removeCR
for %%a in ("!CR!") do (
    set "fileName=!fileName:%%~a=!"
)
goto :eof
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