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I basically want to the C of equivalent of this (well, just the part with the array, I don't need the class and string parsing and all that):

public class Example
{
    static int[] foo;
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
    	int size = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);
    	foo = new int[size]; // This part
    }
}

Pardon my C ignorance. I've been corrupted by java ;)

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Looks like you've been corrupted by C++ as well ;) –  gbarry Mar 15 '09 at 21:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted
/* We include the following to get the prototypes for:
 * malloc -- allocates memory on the freestore
 * free   -- releases memory allocated via above
 * atoi   -- convert a C-style string to an integer
 * strtoul -- is strongly suggested though as a replacement
*/
#include <stdlib.h>
static int *foo;
int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    size_t size = atoi(argv[ 1 ]); /*argv[ 0 ] is the executable's name */
    foo = malloc(size * sizeof *foo); /* create an array of size `size` */
    if (foo) {  /* allocation succeeded */
      /* do something with foo */
      free(foo); /* release the memory */
    }
    return 0;
}

Caveat:Off the cuff stuff, without any error checking.

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You should mention that "if (foo) free(foo);" is the "garbage collection". –  Joel Potter Mar 15 '09 at 21:03
    
Nevermind, looks like you did. +1 ;) –  Joel Potter Mar 15 '09 at 21:04
    
There is no garbage collection in C. I'd be lying ;-) But I did put in some comments. –  dirkgently Mar 15 '09 at 21:04
    
I don't think foo should be declared static, the meaning is different with java. Here we just want a global variable. –  Ben Mar 15 '09 at 21:11
    
What's wrong with static? It's global (file scope), with internal linkage and IMHO much easier to understand for the OP than if I had written a smarter version (there'd be no globals). Also, this is an off-the-cuff version with a lot to left to be desired. –  dirkgently Mar 15 '09 at 21:16

In C, you can do that with this, if you ignore the error checking:

#include <stdlib.h>
static int *foo;

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
     int size = atoi(argv[1]);
     foo = malloc(size * sizeof(*foo));
     ...
}

If you don't want a global variable and you are using C99, you could do:

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int size = atoi(argv[1]);
    int foo[size];
    ...
}

This uses a VLA - variable length array.

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If you need to initialize the data, you can use calloc:

int* arr = calloc (nb_elems, sizeof(int));
/* Do something with your array, then don't forget to release the memory */
free (arr);

This way, the allocated memory will be initialized with zeroes, which can be useful. Note that you can use any data type instead of int.

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int count = getHowManyINeed();
int *foo = malloc(count * sizeof(int));
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Unfortunately, many of the answers to this question, including the accepted one, are correct but not equivalent to the OP's code snippet. Remember that operator new[] calls the default constructor for every array element. For POD types like int that do not have a constructor, they are default-initialized (read: zero-initialized, see §8.5 ¶5-7 of The C++ Standard).

I just exchanged malloc (allocate uninitialized memory) for calloc (allocate zeroed memory), so the equivalent to the given C++ snippet would be

#include <stdlib.h>  /* atoi, calloc, free */

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    size_t size = atoi(argv[1]);
    int *foo;

    /* allocate zeroed(!) memory for our array */
    foo = calloc(sizeof(*foo), size);
    if (foo) {
        /* do something with foo */

        free(foo); /* release the memory */
    }

    return 0;
}

Sorry for reviving this old question but it just didn't feel right to leave without a comment (which I do not have the required rep for) ;-)

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