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I am using Java for this program, and I currently have a situation where I want to add key/value pairs to a table with integer keys, like

add (1, "Bobby")
add (6, "Sue")
add (3, "Mary")
add (8, "John")
add (15, "Joe")

So naturally I want to do something like a hashtable, but when I do a lookup, if it doesn't find the exact value, I would like it to return the nearest key that isn't greater than the requested key.

So for example, if I lookup 7, it should return "Sue", but if I lookup 9, it should return "John"

I'm hoping to use one of the java util classes (HashTable, TreeMap, etc) but I'm not quite sure how to do it.

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1  
Shouldn't get(7) return Sue? –  Martin Vilcans Jun 26 '11 at 18:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

TreeMap from the collections library provides the functionality you're looking for

TreeMap<Integer,String> tree = new TreeMap<Integer,String>();
tree.put (1, "Bobby");
tree.put(6, "Sue");
tree.put (3, "Mary");
tree.put (8, "John");
tree.put (15, "Joe");
System.out.println(tree.floorEntry(7)); // Sue
System.out.println(tree.floorEntry(9)); // John
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Cool thanks! I'll try it. –  Bobby Pardridge Jun 26 '11 at 20:13

NavigableMap would do the trick.

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+1 Looks like a good solution using java –  amelvin Jun 26 '11 at 17:59
    
+1 Didn't realize this is the itf behind TreeMap impl. –  maasg Jun 26 '11 at 18:52

If you wanted to do this using sql something like:

select top 1 * from hashTable where keyColumnId >= @passedValueId

would work.

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Anyway to do it in java? The sql overhead is probably a bit much for this particular thing. Thank you though! –  Bobby Pardridge Jun 26 '11 at 17:58
    
I think that @Eugen Constantin Dinca's answer is a good basis for a java only solution. –  amelvin Jun 26 '11 at 18:00

Well if you mostly read data from the structure and insert rarely you could use a trivial sorted array and do a binary search. Can't get much simpler or simpler if you're worried about search performance. Now not that great if you regularly update the structure - then you'll have to use something more complicated.

Also I think - but not totally sure - wouldn't a binary tree work just as well? Search for the position where the correct node should be and use its predecessor if the value isn't found.

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