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I understand that a possesive regex would go to the end of the text and would not backtrack to see if there was a match before the end. If at the end there's a match it returns true, otherwise it immidiatly returns false. I've tride this:

Pattern patt = Pattern.compile(".*+foo");
Matcher matcher = patt.matcher("xxfooxxxxxfooxxxfoo");
while (matcher.find())
    System.out.println(matcher.group());

It gives me nothing even though there's a match in the end. Any ideas why?

Also I understand that to make a regex lazy/possessive I add ?/+ after the first quantifier (i.e. *? or *+). Is that right? Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

It gives me nothing even though there's a match in the end. Any ideas why?

The .*+ will match the entire input string (including the last foo). And because it does not backtrack from the end of the string, the regex .*+foo does not match.

Also I understand that to make a regex lazy/possessive I add ?/+ after the first quantifier (i.e. *? or *+). Is that right?

The counter part of possessive is not lazy. That would be greedy, which * by default is.

So, the regex .*?foo would match "xxfoo" and the regex .*foo would match "xxfooxxxxxfooxxxfoo".

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Possessive quantifiers will not give up matches on a backtrack. The .*+ matches your entire string and then there's nothing for foo to match.

Er, like Bart said. :)

Use possessive quantifiers only when you know that what you've matched should never be backtracked (e.g., [^f]*+.*foo or, if you know that the only "f" characters will be at the start of "foo", [^f]*+foo).

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1  
So, can you give an example of a possesive regex that would match the entire string? thanks –  yotamoo Jun 26 '11 at 18:49
    
Do you want to match each "foo" or just the last one? –  Ted Hopp Jun 26 '11 at 18:53
    
Can I match all of it with a possesive regex? –  yotamoo Jun 26 '11 at 19:00
    
What do you mean "all of it"? Do you want to match any string that ends with "foo" and avoid backtracking on strings that do not end in "foo", regardless of how many "foo"s occur internally? Or do you have something else in mind? –  Ted Hopp Jun 26 '11 at 19:25

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