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I've been writing a program in python that simulates 100 coin tosses and gives the total number of tosses. The problem is that I also want to print the total number of heads and tails.

Here's my code:

import random
tries = 0
while tries < 100:
    tries += 1
    coin = random.randint(1, 2)
    if coin == 1:
        print('Heads')
    if coin == 2:
        print ('Tails')
total = tries
print(total)

I've been racking my brain for a solution and so far I have nothing. Is there any way to get the number of heads and tails printed in addition to the total number of tosses?

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1  
howabout adding adding a counter in each of the if-cases (one for heads and one for tails)? –  Fredrik Pihl Jun 26 '11 at 21:33
1  
Same as counting tries... but only count when it's printing heads. Something like heads += 1 will be the ticket :-) –  david van brink Jun 26 '11 at 21:34
    
Look at what the "tries" variable does and try to replicate that with a "heads" and a "tails" variable. But don't do heads+=1 every time ... You can figure it out! –  Chris Cunningham Jun 26 '11 at 21:34

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted
import random
tries = 0
heads=0
tails=0
while tries < 100:
    tries += 1
    coin = random.randint(1, 2)
    if coin == 1:
        print('Heads')
        heads+=1
    if coin == 2:
        print ('Tails')
        tails+=1
total = tries
print(total)
print tails
print heads
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1  
Yes, this is the minimal change to the OP's code. Not really idiomatic python, though. –  hughdbrown Jan 28 '12 at 14:27
import random

samples = [ random.randint(1, 2) for i in range(100) ]
heads = samples.count(1)
tails = samples.count(2)

for s in samples:
    msg = 'Heads' if s==1 else 'Tails'
    print msg

print "Heads count=%d, Tails count=%d" % (heads, tails)
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1  
+1 this is much closer to how we normally do things in Python. Free your mind; don't try to think about things a step at a time, because as you've proven to yourself, it's not that easy. Think about what you want accomplished: "I want a sequence of 100 coin flips; I want an output of 'Heads' or 'Tails' for each one in order; I want to display a count of the heads and of the tails". –  Karl Knechtel Jun 27 '11 at 0:49
    
I hope the op tries building this a couple of times. A very good introduction to comprehensions right here (line 3). –  Droogans Jan 28 '12 at 0:00
    
A couple of things. (1) The loop counter i is not read, so you could write: samples = [random.randint(1, 2) for _ in range(100)]. (2) You can use a lookup table for results: messages = {1: "Heads", 2: "Tails"} for s in samples: print messages[s] (3) might be a good place for enumerate: for i, s in enumerate(samples): print i, messages[s] –  hughdbrown Jan 28 '12 at 14:21

You have a variable for the number of tries, which allows you to print that at the end, so just use the same approach for the number of heads and tails. Create a heads and tails variable outside the loop, increment inside the relevant if coin == X block, then print the results at the end.

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P'sao's answer had the code, but you had the explanation. My thanks go out to you as well as P'sao. –  Ru1138 Jun 26 '11 at 22:33

Keep a running track of the number of heads:

import random
tries = 0
heads = 0
while tries < 100:
    tries += 1
    coin = random.randint(1, 2)
    if coin == 1:
        heads += 1
        print('Heads')
    if coin == 2:
        print ('Tails')
total = tries
print('Total heads '.format(heads))
print('Total tails '.format(tries - heads))
print(total)
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tosses = 100
heads = sum(random.randint(0, 1) for toss in range(tosses))
tails = tosses - heads
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You could use random.getrandbits() to generate all 100 random bits at once:

import random

N = 100
# get N random bits; convert them to binary string; pad with zeros if necessary
bits = "{1:>0{0}}".format(N, bin(random.getrandbits(N))[2:])
# print results
print('{total} {heads} {tails}'.format(
    total=len(bits), heads=bits.count('0'), tails=bits.count('1')))

Output

100 45 55
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Hmmm. I didn't know about random.getrandombits. –  hughdbrown Jan 28 '12 at 14:23
# Please make sure to import random.

import random

# Create a list to store the results of the for loop; number of tosses are limited by range() and the returned values are limited by random.choice().

tossed = [random.choice(["heads", "tails"]) for toss in range(100)]

# Use .count() and .format() to calculate and substitutes the values in your output string.

print("There are {} heads and {} tails.".format(tossed.count("heads"), tossed.count("tails")))
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You didn't actually answer the question - you're not counting the number of head or tail tosses. –  cha0site Jan 27 '12 at 23:49
    
@cha0site I don't understand your interpretation of the question. This code counts the number of heads and tails. Run the code and see. –  hughdbrown Jan 28 '12 at 14:27
    
@hughdbrown: It does now, it didn't yesterday... –  cha0site Jan 28 '12 at 15:36

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