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Considering the following :

lalist = {{{{1, 1}, 1}, {{3, 3}, 1}, {{5, 5}, 1}},
          {{{1, 5}, 1}, {{3, 3}, 1}, {{5, 1}, 1}}}

enter image description here

Row[{
  Graphics[{
            Opacity[0.5],Red, 
            Disk @@@ lalist[[1]]}, 
            Frame -> True],
  Graphics[{
            Opacity[0.5],Blue, 
            Disk @@@ lalist[[2]]}, 
            Frame -> True]}
    ]

enter image description here

  • Is it possible that I plot the Blues Disks "behind" the red ones in a 3 D plot ?

Below is not what I need :

enter image description here

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Like this?

Graphics3D[{{Texture[
 Graphics[{Opacity[0.5], Blue, Disk @@@ lalist[[2]]}, 
  Frame -> True]], 
 Polygon[{{-1, -1, -1}, {1, -1, -1}, {1, 1, -1}, {-1, 1, -1}}, 
 VertexTextureCoordinates \[Rule] {{0, 0}, {1, 0}, {1, 1}, {0, 
    1}}]}, {Texture[
 Graphics[{Opacity[0.5], Red, Disk @@@ lalist[[1]]}, 
  Frame -> True]], 
Polygon[{{-1, -1, 1}, {1, -1, 1}, {1, 1, 1}, {-1, 1, 1}}, 
 VertexTextureCoordinates \[Rule] {{0, 0}, {1, 0}, {1, 1}, {0, 
    1}}]}}, Lighting \[Rule] "Neutral"]

enter image description here

Lots of them with opacity .2:

tab = Table[{Opacity \[Rule] .2, 
Texture[Graphics[{Opacity[0.5], Blue, Disk @@@ lalist[[2]]}, 
  Frame -> True]], 
Polygon[{{-1, -1, z}, {1, -1, z}, {1, 1, z}, {-1, 1, z}}, 
 VertexTextureCoordinates \[Rule] {{0, 0}, {1, 0}, {1, 1}, {0, 
    1}}]}, {z, -2, 2, 1}];
plt = Graphics3D[{tab}, Lighting \[Rule] "Neutral"]

enter image description here

and 400 don't seem to be much of a problem in terms of speed (you can easily modify the code above to see it).

EDIT: OK, just to be silly, try this

Dynamic[Graphics3D[{{Texture[#], 
  Polygon[{{-1, -1, -1}, {1, -1, -1}, {1, 1, -1}, {-1, 1, -1}}, 
   VertexTextureCoordinates \[Rule] {{0, 0}, {1, 0}, {1, 1}, {0, 
      1}}]}, {Texture[Rotate[#, \[Pi]/2]], 
  Polygon[{{-1, -1, 1}, {1, -1, 1}, {1, 1, 1}, {-1, 1, 1}}, 
   VertexTextureCoordinates \[Rule] {{0, 0}, {1, 0}, {1, 1}, {0, 
      1}}]}}, Lighting \[Rule] "Neutral"] &@Binarize[CurrentImage[]]]

which gives

enter image description here

(or something like that), rotatable, updated in real time etc.

share|improve this answer
    
@acl, sorry, no I had that, I really want a 3D plot :) How could I better express my question ? –  500 Jun 26 '11 at 21:49
    
@acl, Yes, do you think it could handle 400 of them :) ? –  500 Jun 26 '11 at 21:53
    
@500 only one way to find out :) if it doesn't ask here... –  acl Jun 26 '11 at 21:54
    
@acl ! Thank You ! How can I get it to be transparent so that we only see the shapes ? yet if you look at one you can`t see the other behind it? –  500 Jun 26 '11 at 21:56
    
@acl, Spot On ! Awesome, gives me a lot to play with ! –  500 Jun 26 '11 at 22:08

See the solution presented on "Lunchtime Playground: Fun with Mathematica" here: http://mathgis.blogspot.com/2009/02/howto-display-2d-plot-in-3d.html

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Using transparent textures to render these circles in layers as ACL does is a nice solution, unless one wants to interact with the resulting 3D object. Rendering of 3D objects that contain transparent elements is done in software whereas otherwise it would have been done in hardware:

The 3D renderer uses two different methods of sorting polygons. For graphics scenes that include no transparency, a hardware-accelerated depth buffer is used. Otherwise, the renderer uses a binary space partition tree to split and sort polygons from any viewpoint. The BSP tree is slower to create and is not hardware accelerated, but it provides the most general ability to support polygons.

On my laptop, interaction with 3D graphics is incredibly slow as soon as transparent objects start to appear.

The solution would be to use 3D disks instead of semi transparent planes with 2D disks in them. Since MMA doesn't have 3D Disks or Circles if you want to do something like that, you have to roll your own. A bare-bones version would be something like:

myDisk[{x_, y_, z_}, r_] := 
 Polygon@Table[
               {x, y, z} + r {Cos[\[Phi]], Sin[\[Phi]], 0} // N,
               {\[Phi], 0, 2 \[Pi], 2 \[Pi]/200}
              ]

Your layers would then be generated as follows:

Graphics3D[
 {
   EdgeForm[],
  {
   Red, 
   myDisk[{1, 1, 0.5}, 0.5],  
   myDisk[{0, 0, 0.5}, 0.5],   
   myDisk[{-1, -1, 0.5}, 0.5]
  },
  {
   Blue,  
   myDisk[{1, -1, -0.5}, 0.5],
   myDisk[{0, 0, -0.5}, -0.5], 
   myDisk[{-1, 1, -0.5}, 0.5]}
  }
 ]

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
ah, but my polygons have my face on them! –  acl Jun 27 '11 at 13:02
    
@ACL yeah, I tried your code too. Makes for some criminal looking, rather unrecognizable portraits. Just great for avatars. (Do you wear turtleneck sweaters and a beard, BTW?) –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Jun 27 '11 at 13:06
    
in any case you're right, Opacity does slow things down even on my macbook with its pathetic graphics card. –  acl Jun 27 '11 at 13:09
    
(about the turtleneck and beard, I noticed that too; never even touched a turtleneck and shaved the beard when I finished my PhD in 2005...) –  acl Jun 27 '11 at 13:10
    
@acl I had one the year before I finished my PhD. Makes one wonder what the other guys here (didn't see much gals around) did. –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Jun 27 '11 at 13:13

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