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Using

   value = arc4random() % x

How can I avoid or eliminate modulo bias?

Thanks all.

BTW, at least according to Wikipedia, modulo bias is an issue when programming games of chance.

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1  
Consider re-marking Zoidberg's answer as the correct one, as it's the canonical correct answer according to the authors of arc4random(). –  MikeyWard Dec 30 '12 at 21:59
2  
What is modulo bias? –  bobobobo Apr 15 '13 at 2:03
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6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

arc4random returns a 32-bit unsigned integer (0 to 232-1).

There will probably be no noticable modulo bias for small enough x. However, if you want to be really sure, do this:

y = 2p where 2p-1 < x ≤ 2p

val = arc4random() % y;
while(val >= x)
    val = arc4random() % y;
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You're welcome. =) –  Can Berk Güder Mar 16 '09 at 2:13
    
If I recall, there's something like this in Python's random number generator. –  Lambda Fairy Nov 12 '11 at 0:09
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I happen to trip over same task, C implementation can be found in OpenBSD arc4random_uniform() at src/sys/dev/rnd.c –  SashaN Jun 13 '12 at 8:32
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Use arc4random_uniform(x). This does it for you.

According to the man page:

arc4random_uniform() will return a uniformly distributed random number less than upper_bound. arc4random_uniform() is recommended over constructions like arc4random() % upper_bound as it avoids "modulo bias" when the upper bound is not a power of two.

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This answer is better than the accepted one. –  Carl Norum May 27 '13 at 17:52
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u_int32_t maxValue = ~((u_int32_t) 0);      // equal to 0xffff...
maxValue -= maxValue % x;                   // make maxValue a multiple of x
while((value = arc4random()) >= maxValue) { // loop until we get 0 ≤ value < maxValue
}
value %= x;

although unless you are using any x under a million (or more) I wouldn't worry about it

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If the maximum value of arc4random mod x is greater than x, ignore any values larger than the largest arc4random-max mod x, calling arc4random again instead.

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u_int32_t maxValue = ~((u_int32_t) 0);      // equal to 0xffff...
maxValue -= maxValue % x;                   // make maxValue a multiple of x
while((value = arc4random()) >= maxValue) { // loop until we get 0 ≤ value < maxValue
}
value %= x;

Somewhat pedantic objection to cobbal's answer. It "works", that is it removes the modulo bias, but it rejects more values than are necessary. The most extreme case is x = 2^31. All values of arc4random() should be accepted here but the code as written will reject half of them.

Instead, add 1 to the initialization of maxValue (that puts it at 2^32 so you'll have to use a 64 bit int), and then it's right. You can also avoid using a 64 bit int. Test beforehand if 2^32 % x == 0, if so all arc4random() values are acceptable and you can skip the loop, otherwise you can keep maxValue at 32 bits by subtracting 2^32 % x on initialization.

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Use the method below. It avoids "modulo bias" and it`s fast on iphone . Save you some cpu cycles.

IF you want 4-7:

(random() / (float)RAND_MAX )*3+4

OR if you want 0-8

(random() / (float)RAND_MAX )+8
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