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I've seen some discussions similar to this question, but nothing that truly answers the issue I'm facing.

I'm working on a C# application where the software behavior can be customized through interpreted scripts. Each script is running on a different child thread of the C# app. (I'm using the Jint javascript interpreter to run the scripts, but my question is equally valid for any other circumstance under which a thread could behave dynamically in a .NET application). So far this is working great. But I need to ensure that the application behaves itself. In case of a bad script that could cause the application to run out of heap space, I need the ability to detect and stop any thread that is eating up too much memory. Conceptually, this could seen as similar to a web browser determining if javascript on a page is taking too long or too much memory to execute. The trouble is, I haven't been able to determine if there's any way to do such in .NET.

Is there some way I can either place a hard limit on the amount of memory a thread can utilize, or quickly check the thread's memory utilization from a parent thread? I'm not concerned with stack overflow within the thread, just heap space.

The "obvious" solution of course would be to split the interpreting into seperate processes rather than seperate threads, but that would incur a significant performance hit for my application since these scripts modify the software behavior and thus are intended to be tightly coupled. Application-level monitoring also wouldn't be ideal since it wouldn't provide information on which script isn't behaving itself. Also, a slow method meant for debugging won't work since the scripts are meant to allow for rapid modification of the software rather than having to build, test, and redeploy. I merely need some reasonably fast way to detect a thread that's eating too much memory so I can kill and ignore its script.

Thanks!

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"I'm working on a C# application where the software behavior can be customized through interpreted scripts. Each script is running on a different child thread of the C# app" -? If all you are doing is customising the app. why do the scripts need to run on separate threads? –  Mitch Wheat Jun 26 '11 at 23:36
    
"since these scripts modify the software behavior and thus are intended to be tightly coupled" - I hear the words tightly-coupled scripts and I start wondering about the design.... –  Mitch Wheat Jun 26 '11 at 23:39
    
If you want to limit memory usage then I think you are better off using separate processes. If there is a danger of some script you have absolutely no control over not playing game then I'd make sure it runs on a separate process anyways. I am not sure you can limit the way you want per thread, as, if any API is availabe to do so, it will be a windows API, and as far as I know, you can not map managed threads and windows threads for it to be of any use. –  InBetween Jun 26 '11 at 23:50
    
The scrip changes the software behavior, so the inter-process communication will cost him. While running such script in separate process is better idea/solution. –  Ata Jun 27 '11 at 0:11

2 Answers 2

As other posters suggest, it may be easier to host in a separate process. A slightly lighter- weight approach would be to host in separate app domain and use the app-domain resource monitoring api to monitor memory usage.

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WMI is one option for you. I know for certain that you can monitor process memory usage. But you can explore this idea more.

Here is small intro to WMI in C#. There is a whole set of classes that you can query. And for querying local machine stats, its not going to be very expensive. But I would recommend taking some performance numbers first.

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The problem of this approach, I think, is that there is no one to one relationship between managed threads and windows threads. –  InBetween Jun 26 '11 at 23:48

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