Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am new to Prolog. I am writing Prolog code to solve a puzzle which requires me to find duplicates in a 2 dimensional grid of numbers.


My input is something like:

grid(1,1,1).
grid(2,1,2).
grid(2,1,3).
grid(5,1,4).
grid(3,2,1).
grid(4,2,2).
grid(5,2,3).
grid(9,2,4).
grid(6,3,1).
grid(7,3,2).
grid(2,3,3).
grid(8,3,4).
grid(4,4,1).
grid(5,4,2).
grid(1,4,3).
grid(3,4,4).


which represents the matrix:

1 2 2 5
3 4 5 9
6 7 2 8
4 5 1 3


The code I was trying was something like:

finddup(N,X,Y):-
        a is X, b is Y,
        print('Rule 1 \n'),
        ((grid(N,U,1), U \= a, print('U->'), write(U), print('\n'), print('X->'), write(a));
        (grid(N,1,U), U \= b, print('U->'), write(U), print('\n'), print('Y->'), write(b));
        (grid(N,U,4), U \= a, print('U->'), write(U), print('\n'), print('X->'), write(a));
        grid(N,4,U), U \= b, print('U->'), write(U), print('\n'), print('Y->'), write(b)));
        print('Rule 2 \n'),
        ((finddup(N,X-1,Y), X-1 >= 1, X-1 =< 4, Y >= 1, Y =< 4);
        (finddup(N,X+1,Y), X+1 >= 1, X+1 =< 4, Y >= 1, Y =< 4);
        (finddup(N,X,Y-1), X >= 1, X =< 4, Y-1 >= 1, Y-1 =< 4);
        (finddup(N,X,Y+1), X >= 1, X =< 4, Y+1 >= 1, Y+1 =< 4)).


Please help me out guys ... I have been trying this since a week or two ...


Thanks,
Vikas

share|improve this question
    
I don't get it. The matrix is represented by the first column, right? What the other columns are for? What do you call duplicate? And what you expect from your input example? –  Ravan Jun 27 '11 at 0:34
    
My i/p is the grid above stated as rules. My o/p should be like, if I query for finddup(1,1,1). should return false ... similarly finddup(2,1,3). must return TRUE since there's an occurence of another 2 in the same row and colum (grid (2,1,2) and grid(2,3,3). –  Vikas Upendra Jun 27 '11 at 1:05
    
Maybe you want to reformulate your question a bit. Why do you want to detect duplicates? I suspect that you finally want to treat the matrix as one big term. –  false Jun 27 '11 at 20:14

1 Answer 1

You don't need to try and specify the ranges of the row and column indices since they are already explicitly given in the grid(..) facts. Just let Prolog backtrack over the values.

finddup(N,R,C) :-
    grid(N,R,C),
    grid(N,R,C2), C \= C2,
    grid(N,R2,C), R \= R2.

grid(N,R,C) will verify that the given values are in the grid, or it will backtrack over all the possible combinations if any (or all) of N, R, C have no values.

grid(N,R,C2), C \= C2, will find another column in the same row that has the same N.

Likewise for grid(N,R2,C), R \= R2 - but for another row.

This will return a true for any duplicate it finds, but will probably return a false after that, since the last backtrack may fail. For example:

?- finddup(N,R,C).
N = 2,
R = 1,
C = 3 ;
false.

?- finddup(2,1,3).
true ;
false.

?- 

(where the semicolons are user input)

You can add a cut at the end to stop any further backtracking once a solution has been found:

finddup(N,R,C) :-
    grid(N,R,C),
    grid(N,R,C2), C \= C2,
    grid(N,R2,C), R \= R2, !.

gives

?- finddup(N,R,C).
N = 2,
R = 1,
C = 3.

?- finddup(2,1,3).
true.

?- 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Nick ... u rock dude .... really appreciate ur help ... –  Vikas Upendra Jun 27 '11 at 6:15
    
@Vikas Upendra: If Nick answered your question, don't forget to accept his answer. Or, leave a comment if something is still unresolved. –  hardmath Jun 29 '11 at 17:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.