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I have a query with ORDER BY name and the index on name is being ignored.

How can I optimize the query to use an index and get rid of Using temporary from EXPLAIN?

I have log-queries-not-using-indexes enabled and I'm seeing this query thousands of times.

Here's the query:

SELECT l.parent_id, j.id, j.location_id, j.currency, j.frequency, ROUND((j.salary_min + j.salary_max)/2) as salary 
FROM jobs AS j
JOIN location AS l
    ON j.location_id = l.id
WHERE j.salary_min !=0 
    AND j.status != 'Rejected'      
    AND l.published =1
    AND date_sub(now(), interval 1 month) <= j.effected_date
ORDER BY l.name

The explain:

+----+-------------+-------+--------+----------------------------------+---------------+---------+----------------------------+------+----------------------------------------------+
| id | select_type | table | type   | possible_keys                    | key           | key_len | ref                        | rows | Extra                                        |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+----------------------------------+---------------+---------+----------------------------+------+----------------------------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | j     | range  | effected_date,location_id,status | effected_date | 9       | NULL                       |  562 | Using where; Using temporary; Using filesort |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | l     | eq_ref | PRIMARY                          | PRIMARY       | 4       | esljw_joomla.j.location_id |    1 | Using where                                  |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+----------------------------------+---------------+---------+----------------------------+------+----------------------------------------------+
2 rows in set (0.01 sec)

And the table structure:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `jobs` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `location_id` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `status` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
  `currency` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
  `salary_min` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  `salary_max` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  `effected_date` datetime DEFAULT NULL,
  `frequency` varchar(255) NOT NULL DEFAULT '1',
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `effected_date` (`effected_date`),
  KEY `location_id` (`location_id`),
  KEY `status` (`status`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 AUTO_INCREMENT=10130 ;

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `location` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `name` varchar(128) DEFAULT NULL,
  `parent_id` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `name` (`name`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 AUTO_INCREMENT=304 ;
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

  1. Add published + id composite index to location table
  2. Move l.published =1 condition to the ON clause

This is what you can to do in your case. But probbaly you'll never get rid of using temporary since you're sorting not by primary table, but by joined table.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain what you mean by moving the l.published=1 to the ON clause? –  David Rogers Jun 27 '11 at 0:16
    
@David Rogers: ON j.location_id = l.id AND l.published=1 –  zerkms Jun 27 '11 at 0:18
    
Hmm... I tried alter table location add index id_pub (id, published) and alter table location add index pub_id (published, id). EXPLAIN still chooses the primary j.id index and doesn't use the new indexes. –  David Rogers Jun 27 '11 at 0:32

It's because you've listed job first. Change the order of the tables, like this:

SELECT l.parent_id, j.id, j.location_id, j.currency, j.frequency, ROUND((j.salary_min + j.salary_max)/2) as salary 
FROM location AS l
JOIN jobs AS j  ON j.location_id = l.id
WHERE j.salary_min !=0 
AND j.status != 'Rejected'      
AND l.published =1
AND date_sub(now(), interval 1 month) <= j.effected_date
ORDER BY l.name

Try it and post how it goes.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I tried that already. It still gives the same explain output. Thanks though! =) –  David Rogers Jun 27 '11 at 0:16

Many times I've done queries where you have proper primary table as first in query, with good indexes, adding STRAIGHT_JOIN alone can fix a query. So, with your existing criteria, you should be good with your date index and use that as the primary criteria... such as

SELECT STRAIGHT_JOIN
      L.Parent_ID, 
      J.id, 
      J.location_id, 
      J.currency, 
      J.frequency, 
      ROUND(( J.salary_min + J.salary_max) / 2 ) as Salary 
   FROM
      jobs J
         join Location L
            on J.Location_ID = L.ID
            AND L.Published = 1
   WHERE
          J.Effected_Date >= date_sub(now(), interval 1 month)
      AND J.salary_min != 0
      AND J.status != 'Rejected'
   ORDER BY 
      L.name
share|improve this answer
    
Ha, I never even heard of STRAIGHT_JOIN, I'm going to have to research that. =) The query works great but EXPLAIN still shows Using where; Using temporary; Using filesort –  David Rogers Jun 27 '11 at 0:41

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