Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
#define MAX(a,b) ((dx > dy) ? dx : dy)

Would anyone mind breaking down the ((dx > dy) ? dx : dy) part? This comes from console lessons 1-60.

share|improve this question
    
Which part, the > or the ?? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jun 27 '11 at 1:28
4  
-1 That does not appear to be real code (arguments a b not used). –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jun 27 '11 at 1:29
1  
This question isn't even really related to the preprocessor. Just to a basic C operation –  Ken Wayne VanderLinde Jun 27 '11 at 1:31

6 Answers 6

It is roughly equivalent to:

int MAX (int dx, int dy)
{
  if (dx > dy)
    return dx;
  else
    return dy;
}

It is also not correct. It should be:

#define MAX(a,b) ((a)>(b))?(a):(b)
share|improve this answer

You're looking at the Ternary operator.

share|improve this answer

As written, the line doesn't make sense to me. But

#define MAX(a, b)  ((a > b) ? a : b)

translates roughly, in pseudocode, to

#define MAX(a,b)  if (a > b) then a else b
share|improve this answer
1  
it should be noted that the () around each thing passed to the macro is important as you could easily go MAX(1>2=2,2) and it would translate to: if (1>2=2 > b) { return 1>2=2; } else { return b; } which is invalid code. –  graphitemaster Jun 27 '11 at 3:33
    
@graphitemaster: Yes, you should always over-parenthesize macro arguments to limit nasty (and hard-to-debug) side-effects. I kept it simple for clarity, but code like my example should never make it to production. Thanks for noticing! –  Adam Liss Jun 27 '11 at 22:16

test ? expr1 : expr2 is the ternary operator. This expression evaluates to expr1 if test is true and to expr2 otherwise.

share|improve this answer

It means that if dx is greater then dy then select dx, otherwise select dy.

share|improve this answer
int MAX (int dx, int dy)
{
  if (dx > dy)
    return dx;
  else
    return dy;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.