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I want to do something when a keypress changes the input of a textbox. I figure the keypress event would be best for this, but how do I know if it caused a change? I need to filter out things like pressing the arrow keys, or modifiers... I don't think hardcoding all the values is the best approach.

So how should I do it?

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up vote 22 down vote accepted

In most browsers, you can use the HTML5 input event for text-type <input> elements:

$("#testbox").on("input", function() {
    alert("Value changed!");
});

This doesn't work in IE < 9, but there is a workaround: the propertychange event.

$("#testbox").on("propertychange", function(e) {
    if (e.originalEvent.propertyName == "value") {
        alert("Value changed!");
    }
});

IE 9 supports both, so in that browser it's better to prefer the standards-based input event. This conveniently fires first, so we can remove the handler for propertychange the first time input fires.

Putting it all together (jsFiddle):

var propertyChangeUnbound = false;
$("#testbox").on("propertychange", function(e) {
    if (e.originalEvent.propertyName == "value") {
        alert("Value changed!");
    }
});

$("#testbox").on("input", function() {
    if (!propertyChangeUnbound) {
        $("#testbox").unbind("propertychange");
        propertyChangeUnbound = true;
    }
    alert("Value changed!");
});
share|improve this answer
    
Cool! Didn't know about these events. I'd like to support older browsers though :( – mpen Jun 27 '11 at 17:16
2  
@Mark: For text <input>s, you're OK in pretty much everything major with this: Safari 3+, all Chrome, Firefox 2+, IE 6+ (possibly even 5), Opera something like 9+. For textareas, the support is not quite as good. – Tim Down Jun 27 '11 at 22:00
    
@Mark: By the way, this is a favourite topic of @Andy E (stackoverflow.com/users/94197/andy-e), who has answered several related questions on SO and blogged about it: whattheheadsaid.com/projects/input-special-event and whattheheadsaid.com/2010/09/…. – Tim Down Jun 27 '11 at 22:04
    
The "input" event is supported that far back?? Why don't more people know about this? That's crazy. – mpen Jun 27 '11 at 22:43
1  
@henrywright: Using contenteditable, I guess? Recent Mozilla and WebKit have the input event on contenteditable elements. IE does not. I'm guessing Opera may well do now that it uses WebKit. See also stackoverflow.com/questions/1391278/… – Tim Down Jan 12 '14 at 22:34

.change() is what you're after

$("#testbox").keyup(function() {
   $(this).blur();
   $(this).focus(); 
   $(this).val($(this).val()); // fix for IE putting cursor at beginning of input on focus
}).change(function() {
   alert("change fired");
});
share|improve this answer
4  
.change() doesn't fire until the textbox loses focus. It sounds like he wants to be notified on keypress. – spb Jun 27 '11 at 2:58
    
he might be able to work around that by adding a keypress event that does a blur()/focus() – Jason Miesionczek Jun 27 '11 at 3:00
2  
jsfiddle.net/VL9e4/2 – Jason Miesionczek Jun 27 '11 at 3:03
    
@spb: check out my jsfiddle, shows an example of the workaround i mentioned above – Jason Miesionczek Jun 27 '11 at 3:04
    
That works well. You should move that jsfiddle into your answer. – spb Jun 27 '11 at 3:07

This is how I would do it: http://jsfiddle.net/JesseAldridge/Pggpt/1/

$('#input1').keyup(function(){
    if($('#input1').val() != $('#input1').attr('prev_val'))
        $('#input2').val('change')
    else
        $('#input2').val('no change')
    $('#input1').attr('prev_val', $('#input1').val())
})
share|improve this answer
    
Should use .data instead of .attr but I think this approach is good too. – mpen Jun 27 '11 at 3:35
    
You could make that a bit more flexible by changing all the $("#input1") to $(this) (within the event handler) – Jason Miesionczek Jun 27 '11 at 3:40
1  
@Jason: That too. Was thinking the same thing. jsfiddle.net/mnbayazit/WCmSn – mpen Jun 27 '11 at 3:47
1  
It's also possible to bypass the keyup event if you hold down a letter key while inside the textbox, and then click outside. Not likely...but still an event that should be guarded against. Need to combine with .change I think for robustness. Also, this won't fire for each letter than is entered during a long keypress, just once at the end. Which is fine in my case, but...kinda sad that I don't think there's anything we can do about that. – mpen Jun 27 '11 at 3:53
    
@Mark - it's also possible to bypass all key events if you use the mouse to cut, paste, delete or drop. (Though you did already mention combining with the change event so you should be OK.) Also, you mention keyup not firing for each letter if you hold down a key, but keypress should. – nnnnnn Jun 27 '11 at 5:57

I came up with this for autosaving a textarea. It uses a combination of the .keyUp() jQuery method to see if the content has changed. And then I update every 5 seconds because I don't want the form getting submitted every time it's changed!!!!

var savePost = false;

jQuery(document).ready(function() { 
    setInterval('autoSave()', 5000)
    $('input, textarea').keyup(function(){
        if (!savePost) {
            savePost = true;    
        }
    })
})


function autoSave() {
    if (savePost) {
        savePost = false;
        $('#post_submit, #task_submit').click();            
    }
}

I know it will fire even if the content hasn't changed but it was easier that hardcoding which keys I didn't want it to work for.

share|improve this answer
    
Err..that's not really what I asked. I'm not trying to build an autosave feature, so this doesn't really work for me at all. – mpen Jun 27 '11 at 3:37

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