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are these correct implementations of the operator<< and >> for bitshifting? for some reason, in my operator/, where it only involves these 2 operators, something is allowing for a silly jump that is causing division to be done incorrectly.

    // the value is stored msb in a list of uint8_t
    // so 0x123456 will be stored in the list as {0x12, 0x34, 0x56}
    integer operator<<(size_t shift){
        std::list <uint8_t> out = value;
        for(unsigned int i = 0; i < (shift >> 3); i++)
            out.push_back(0);
        shift &= 7;
        if (shift){
            out.push_front(0);
            std::list <uint8_t>::iterator i = out.begin(), j = out.end();
            i++; j--;
            for(; i != j; i++){
                uint8_t temp = *i >> (8 - shift);
                --i;
                *i += temp;
                i++;
                *i = (uint8_t) (*i << shift);
            }
            uint8_t temp = *i >> (8 - shift);
            i--;
            *i += temp;
            i++;
            *i <<= shift;
        }
        return integer(out);
    }

    integer operator>>(size_t shift){
        std::list <uint8_t> out = value;
        for(unsigned int i = 0; i < (shift >> 3); i++)
            out.pop_back();
        shift &= 7;
        if (shift){
            std::list <uint8_t>::reverse_iterator i = out.rbegin(), j = out.rend();
            j--;
            for(; i != j; i++){
                *i >>= shift;
                i++;
                uint8_t temp = *i << (8 - shift);
                i--;
                *i += temp;
            }
            *j >>= shift;
        }
        return integer(out);
    }

heres what im doing:

integer(1234567) / integer(6)

inside division algorithm (long division):

numerator       largest multiple of denomiator < numeator

12d687          0c0000
06d687          060000
d687            c000
1687            0c00
0a87            0600
0487            0300
0187            0c        <-- where did this come from??
017b            0180

is the error in one of the operators shown or in some other operator?

heres my entire code: http://ideone.com/ncq9S

share|improve this question
    
I would use an std::vector in this algorithm. I'd also get rid of the statement i = i. –  larsmans Jun 27 '11 at 5:26
    
i would use vector too, but i need to push front some values –  calccrypto Jun 27 '11 at 5:38
    
Ah yes, hadn't spotted that. –  larsmans Jun 27 '11 at 5:40
2  
std::deque has almost as much efficiency as std::vector but also allows both push_front and push_back. –  Potatoswatter Jun 27 '11 at 5:50
    
im not asking about what container to use. im trying to figure out whats wrong with the actions the computer is taking due to my commands –  calccrypto Jun 27 '11 at 5:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
template <typename T>

Does this really need to be parameterized? It would seem that any shift quantity can be stored in a size_t, and converting to size_t implicitly or explicitly would be a good idea before starting the rest of the process.

integer operator<<(T shift){

Usually binary operator functions are best implemented as non-member friends. For example, fewer conversions are considered when producing the this pointer than for generic operands. I'd write friend integer operator<< ( integer lhs, size_t shift ).

    std::list <uint8_t> out = value;

If you use a friend and pass-by-value, then this copy is made implicitly. The compiler also has an easier time eliminating it if you are really just modifying one object, e.g. q = q << 3.

    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < (shift >> 3); i++)// get rid of bytes if shift > 8

Be careful in the loop condition. You're applying an operator to a high-level type, which might cause an expensive computation (or even endless recursion if T is integer!

    shift &= 7;                                   // shift by less than a byte

At this point, if shift == 0 you are done. Best to insert a conditional return here. Also, now the range is really limited, so assign to a narrower type than T.

    out.push_front(0);                            // extra byte for overflow

This is only necessary if the byte will be nonzero. Probably best to special-case the first operation and make the push_front conditional, instead of special-casing the last.

… Hmm, it looks like the operator>> is being exercised more… skipping to that…

    for(; i != j; i++){
        i++;
        uint8_t temp = *i << (8 - shift);
        i--;
        *i += temp;
    }
    *j >>= shift;

Clearly the >> operator is missing from the loop. Try *i = *i >> shift + temp. Also, I don't see how the list ever gets shorter. Is that done in integer::integer( list<…> )?

However, I can't really see what produces the behavior in the posted output. The leading zero is probably a result of the unconditional push_front in operator<<, but the pattern I'd expect is c, 6, 3, 18, c, …. You don't seem to be repeating any sequence, but instead jump randomly.

Maybe the division code, or the class constructor could provide clues.

share|improve this answer
    
@calc: This isn't optimization, it's cleanup. Cutting out the fat without considering performance will expose the actual algorithm and hopefully, its bugs. –  Potatoswatter Jun 27 '11 at 6:27
    
oops. i fixed operator<< i hope. i edited my question so that some of the changes you suggested have been done. theres also a link to the full code. now the operator/ works, but im getting the wrong answer –  calccrypto Jun 27 '11 at 6:41
    
and yes, there is a function called clean() that removes bytes at the front that == 0, as shown in the full code –  calccrypto Jun 27 '11 at 6:42
    
nope. the division algorithm is correct now –  calccrypto Jun 27 '11 at 6:48

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