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I am new to Shell script. Just have a small question about some script I wrote.

pkgs="./cppcheck-1.48.tar.bz2 ./sshpass-1.04.tar.gz"
for pkg in $pkgs ; do
echo ${pkg} | grep -qE "bz2$"

if [ $? ] ; then
                echo "here1"
else
                echo "here2"            
fi

done

It always prints here1, i.e. if condition is always true. I am not able to pin point any reason for it till now. Please point me towards right direction.

I know I can use shell's switch command. Just want to know what is wrong with this. Shell is /bin/bash

[EDIT] - switch statement works flawlessly. For those who face this problem some other time

case ${pkg} in
     *bz2) echo "here1";;
     *) echo "here2";;
esac
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

if [ $? ] does not work as you might expect:

$ false ; if [ $? ] ; then echo "true" ; else echo "false" ; fi 
true
$ true ; if [ $? ] ; then echo "true" ; else echo "false" ; fi 
true

It's easy enough to fix by comparing against 0 explicitly:

$ false ; if [ $? -eq 0 ] ; then echo "true" ; else echo "false" ; fi 
false
$ true ; if [ $? -eq 0 ] ; then echo "true" ; else echo "false" ; fi 
true

So for your script:

pkgs="./cppcheck-1.48.tar.bz2 ./sshpass-1.04.tar.gz"
for pkg in $pkgs ; do
echo ${pkg} | grep -qE "bz2$"

if [ $? -eq 0 ] ; then
                echo "here1"
else
                echo "here2"            
fi

done

here1
here2
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for explaining. – Anon Jun 27 '11 at 5:58

Bash has both arithmetic and conditional expressions.

The answer sarnold gives is a way to force this to work using a conditional expression but if you want to use an arithmetic expression instead you can replace

[ $? ]

with

(( $? ))

If you search the bash man pages for these topics there is a lot more information on how these work.

edit: My mistake, conditional expressions are [[ ]]. (( )) gives the behaviour you were probably expecting though.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I really liked your answer. Pointed me towards something I did not know.Upvoted :) – Anon Jun 27 '11 at 5:57

Replace echo ${pkg} | grep -qE "bz2$" by echo ${pkg} | grep -q -E "bz2$" and it will work like a charm! [EDIT] Oops.. also change the if () condition to if [ $? -ne 1 ] ; then

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