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class A {



  public void someMethod() {
         String var = "Abhi";
         var = "Abhishek";
  }
}

Will the var variable store Abhi and Abhishek in different memory location or Abhishek overwrites Abhi ??

If i use this expression String var= new String();, then what?

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Bohemian, Gregory Pakosz, Denis de Bernardy, Andrew Aylett, Graviton Jun 27 '11 at 14:38

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
It is syntactically incorrect to redeclare any variable in such a manner as String var = "Abhi"; String var = "Abhishek"; – jerluc Jun 27 '11 at 6:36
    
What are u trying to achieve? – gmhk Jun 27 '11 at 6:38
3  
If this compiled, I'd answer, but you have made no effort to ask a reasonable question. – Bohemian Jun 27 '11 at 6:39
    
The newly edited code still won't compile, because you can't have arbitrary statements (such as this assignment) in the method body. – Joachim Sauer Jun 27 '11 at 6:48
    
@Bohemian I am extremely sorry Sir. I have edited my code please see – Abhisek Jun 27 '11 at 6:57
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Given this method:

public void someMethod() {
    String var = "Abhi";
    var = "Abhishek";
}

In this example there are 3 relevant things:

  • There's a variable called var. This variable is stored on the stack (because it's a local variable) and can hold the reference to some object.
  • There's the String object with the content Abhi: it's the first thing that var references right after its declaration.
  • There's the String object with the content Abhishek: var is modified to reference this object in the second line where var is mentioned.

So in respect to memory: the two String objects are stored in distinct spaces, unrelated to each other. var however, only ever occupies the same place (during a single invocation of foo, that is). So the reference to Abhi is overwritten with a reference to Abhishek.

If you add the line var= new String(); at the end of that method, then that line would do two things:

  1. create a new String object representing the empty String and
  2. assign a reference to that new String object to the variable var.

Note that there is almost never a reason to use that String constructor, because "" has (almost) the exact same effect.

share|improve this answer
    
WHOA.. how did I miss that? LOL Thanks. Sorry. – Steve Jun 27 '11 at 7:31
    
Joachim, maybe you could add a small section about the String pool to clarify the difference between var = new String() and var = ""? – Adriaan Koster Jun 27 '11 at 8:36
    
@Adriaan: I'm not sure that it would help here. The OP seems to be asking about the relation of objects and variables and I tried to explain that. Explaining the string pool now would just add more information to grok that's not terribly important in this context. – Joachim Sauer Jun 27 '11 at 8:42

They will probably be distinct memory values.

Of course it is conceivable that some advanced JVM could implement this feature, but it is probably unlikely and I've never heard of such an optimization being used in a real compiler; especially considering that this a pretty low payoff optimization (you save a few bytes that would've otherwise been used to represent the shorter string), which requires some pretty special conditions to work (ie you have one string constant which is the prefix of another).

EDIT: Corrected answer according to Jesper's comment.

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1  
Strings in Java are not stored as null-terminated character arrays. – Jesper Jun 27 '11 at 6:43
1  
Java does not use null terminated strings (and it's String objects are definitely not simple char-arrays). – Joachim Sauer Jun 27 '11 at 6:43
    
@Jesper: You are correct, I just fixed the answer. – Mikola Jun 27 '11 at 6:46

Will the var variable store Abhi and Abhishek in different memory location or Abhishek overwrites Abhi ??

Neither. This code will not compile, because you are declaring two variables with the same name var.

If we look at this:

class A {
    public void someMethod {
        String var = "Abhi";
        var = "Abhishek";
    }
}

The second assignment to var will make var refer to a different String object.

Note that in Java, variables are references to objects - they do not represents objects directly (as in C++).

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Your new string will be put into new location in memory because it will be a new object, but don't worry... there is garbage collection mechanism in java so your old object memory will be restored right after that because there will be no reference for your old string object...

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Except that String literals are not garbage collected - they are stored in the string pool and remain there until the JVM exits. – Jesper Jun 27 '11 at 6:44
    
@Jesper: actually, that's not true (or at least no longer). Even interned String values can be GCed if they are not referenced anywhere else anymore. – Joachim Sauer Jun 27 '11 at 6:47
    
@Joachim aha, I didn't know that. – Jesper Jun 27 '11 at 6:48

Also, it is worth mentioning the immutability of String objects in Java. Specifically, in your example, even though you are overwriting the reference to the String that the variable var is referencing, the data itself is not being "overwritten".

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In Java, you can't define "var" twice. It will not simply create a new memory location and throw a new instance of "var" in there. Our first step has to be fixing your code. Instead, your code will look like this:

  String var = "Abhi";
  var = "Abhishek";

Therefore, to answer your first question, yes. "Abhishek" will overwrite "Abhi".

If you use

String var= new String();

that means you create a new instance of the class String and you assign it to var. Var becomes a new, empty (I believe), string.

share|improve this answer
    
That will also not compile, because you cannot have an assignment statement like that at class level. – Jesper Jun 27 '11 at 6:45
    
Whoops. You're right, I didn't notice that when I posted it. :D – Kevin Wang Jun 27 '11 at 7:09

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