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How can I get yesterday's date?

maybe:

@get_time_now    = Time.now.strftime('%m/%d/%Y') / 86400 

or

@get_time_now    = Time.now.strftime('%m/%d/%Y') - 1.day

or

@get_time_now    = Time.now. / 86400 

86400 = 1 day, right? (60 * 60 * 24)

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6  
not all days are 86400 seconds long (boundaries of daylight savings changes are +/- 1 hour). –  Tim Peters Jun 27 '11 at 8:20

6 Answers 6

up vote 58 down vote accepted

For a date object you could use:

Date.yesterday

Or a time object:

1.day.ago

Or outside of rails:

Date.today.prev_day
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thanks. problem is solved –  Michael Gorsky Jun 27 '11 at 7:58
8  
Time.now - 1.day also works, just mentioning for completeness. –  Gazler Jun 27 '11 at 8:00
1  
@Gazler: Not quite. As Tim Peters has mentioned above, 24 hours isn't always the same as a day. –  Jørgen Fogh Dec 12 '11 at 12:34
1  
Date.yesterday considers timezone and will not always give the same answer as Date.today - 1.days. –  John Naegle Mar 1 '12 at 4:16
7  
This assumes rails and not ruby. Not the best suggestion. –  Mike Silvis Sep 25 '13 at 3:57

Ruby 2.1.2 Native Time

Answer:

Time.at(Time.now.to_i - 86400)

Proof:

2.1.2 :016 > Time.now
 => 2014-07-01 13:36:24 -0400 
2.1.2 :017 > Time.now.to_i
 => 1404236192 
2.1.2 :018 > Time.now.to_i - 86400
 => 1404149804 
2.1.2 :019 > Time.at(Time.now.to_i - 86400)
 => 2014-06-30 13:36:53 -0400 

One Day of Seconds.

86400 = 1 day (60 * 60 * 24)

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use DateTime.now - 1

1.9.3p194 :040 > DateTime.now
 => Mon, 18 Nov 2013 17:58:45 +0530 
1.9.3p194 :041 > DateTime.now - 1
 => Sun, 17 Nov 2013 17:58:49 +0530 

or DateTime.yesterday

1.9.3p194 :042 > DateTime.yesterday
 => Sun, 17 Nov 2013 
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After trying 1.day.ago and variants on it:

irb(main):005:0> 1.day.ago
NoMethodError: undefined method `day' for 1:Fixnum

if found that Date.today.prev_day works for me:

irb(main):016:0> Date.today.prev_day
=> #<Date: 2013-04-09 ((2456392j,0s,0n),+0s,2299161j)>
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You probably arent using Rails. ActiveSupport gives you this functionality –  SirLenz0rlot Feb 5 at 15:34

Use Date.today - 1.days.

Date.yesterday depends on the current time and your offset from GMT

1.9.3-p125 :100 > Date.today
 => Wed, 29 Feb 2012 
1.9.3-p125 :101 > Date.yesterday
 => Wed, 29 Feb 2012 
1.9.3-p125 :102 > Date.today - 1.days
 => Tue, 28 Feb 2012 
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You can just subtract 86400 from a Time object to get one day before. If you are using Rails, or have ActiveSupport included, you can replace 86400 with 1.days.

If you're using a Date object, and not a Time object, just subtract 1 from it.

To check if one date/time is before/after another, just compare the two objects like you would do for numbers:

DateTime.parse("2009-05-17T22:38:42-07:00") < DateTime.parse("2009-05-16T22:38:42-07:00")
# => false
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