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I dont understand why I am not been able to change the color of the text 'Welcome'. Following are the two approaches, any help would be appreciated.

<html> 
    <head>
        <script language="text/javascript">
            function changeColor(c) {
                message.style.color=c;
            }
        </script>
     </head>
     <body>
         <p id="message" style="color:orange"> Welcome </p>
         <ul id="color">
             <li onclick='changeColor(this.innerText);'>Blue</li>
             <li onclick='changeColor(this.style.color);'>Red</li>
          </ul>
     </body>
</html>
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7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're relying on a couple of things there I would recommend not relying on:

  1. message being a global because you've given it as an id value. Instead, use document.getElementById to look up the element.

  2. innerText is mostly a Microsoft thing. With your example as shown, you could use innerHTML, which is reliable cross-browser, but I'd recommend storing the color in a data- attribute instead so your label can be whatever you want it to be (including being a different language than the CSS color names).

Here's how I'd probably approach it without introducing any libraries and keeping things fairly simple:

Markup:

<p id="message" style="color:orange"> Welcome </p>
<ul id="color">
<li data-color="blue">Blue</li>
<li data-color="red">Red</li>
</ul>

JavaScript:

(function() {
  var ul = document.getElementById('color'),
      list = ul.getElementsByTagName('li'),
      message = document.getElementById('message'),
      index;
  for (index = 0; index < list.length; ++index) {
    list[index].onclick = changeColor;
  }

  function changeColor() {
    message.style.color = this.getAttribute('data-color');
  }
})();

Live example

The script tag containing the JavaScript must be after the markup in order to work correctly.

That relies solely on standards and should be compliant with all major browsers. The data- attributes are invalid in HTML4 (if validation is part of your workflow), but they work fine with all major (and probably all minor) browsers. They are valid as of HTML5 (which allows any attribute with the prefix data- on any element, for exactly this purpose).


Update: Re your comment below:

How to change the changeColor function so tht it accepts changeColor(this.innerText);'? Or changeColor(this.style.color); ??

If you're looking to separate out the functionality (perfectly reasonable), you'd do this:

(function() {
  var ul = document.getElementById('color'),
      list = ul.getElementsByTagName('li'),
      message = document.getElementById('message'),
      index;
  for (index = 0; index < list.length; ++index) {
    list[index].onclick = changeColorViaDataAttr;
  }

  function changeColorViaDataAttr() {
    changeColor(this.getAttribute('data-color'));
  }

  function changeColor(color) {
    message.style.color = color;
  }
})();

Live example

Since the functions only change the color of the message element, actually probably best to rename those functions slightly, but you get the idea.


Off-topic: A lot of this stuff can be a lot easier if you leverage the hard work done by people who've created libraries like jQuery, Prototype, YUI, Closure, or any of several others. Those libraries help smooth over browser differences and provide a lot of utility functionality. For instance, the way I've hooked up the event handlers above (assigning to the onclick property), like your onclick attributes, is very old-fashioned, but the more up-to-date way varies a bit because of older Microsoft browsers and so would have complicated the example a fair bit. Libraries smooth over that sort of thing for you.

Here's that same JavaScript code using jQuery:

(function() {
  $("#color li").click(changeColor);

  function changeColor() {
    $("#message").css("color", this.getAttribute("data-color"));
  }
})();

Live example

Although you could make it even more compact if you like:

(function() {
  $("#color li").click(function() {
    $("#message").css("color", $(this).data("color"));
  });
})();

Live example

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How to change the changeColor function so tht it accepts changeColor(this.innerText);'? Or changeColor(this.style.color); ?? –  Abdul Muqtadir Jun 27 '11 at 8:43

Well, that's because message is an undefined variable. What you need to do is this:

function changeColor(c) {
    document.getElementById('message').style.color = c;
}
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<li onclick='changeColor(this.innerText);'>Blue</li> does not work, because function changeColor expects the color as an argument, not the text.

<li onclick='changeColor(this.style.color);'>Red</li> does not work, because the variable message in the body of changeColor is not defined.

At least the second error you could have caught yourself if you had looked into the error console of your browser.

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How to change the changeColor function so tht it accepts changeColor(this.innerText);'? –  Abdul Muqtadir Jun 27 '11 at 8:27

If you want to get an element using it's ID, you need to do this: document.getElementById("message")

So, like this:

<script type="javascript">

function changeColor(c)
{
     document.getElementById("message").style.color=c;
}

</script>
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The parameter to your changeColor function should be the colour that you want to display. In the function you need to actually get a reference to the DOM object you intend to manipulate, using:

document.getElementById("message").style.color = c;

In your example, message is an undefined global variable, so replace that with a reference to the required DOM element and it should work fine.

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  1. In your script tag you have language= which should be type=
  2. You should use document.getElementById("message") instead of message.
  3. You should feed the function with an actual color. The string text "Blue" is not a color

    function changeColor(c)
    {
       document.getElementById("message").style.color = c;
    }
    
share|improve this answer

One option could be to do

<li style="color:Red" onclick='changeColor(this.style.color);'>Red</li>

instead of

<li onclick='changeColor(this.style.color);'>Red</li>



<html> 
        <head>
            <script language="text/javascript">
                function changeColor(c) {
                    message.style.color=c;
                }
            </script>
         </head>
         <body>
             <p id="message" style="color:orange"> Welcome </p>
             <ul id="color">
              <li style="color:Red" onclick='changeColor(this.style.color);'>Red</li>
               <li style="color:Blue" onclick='changeColor(this.style.color);'>Blue</li>
              </ul>
         </body>
    </html>
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