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In most of the threading examples in Java, there is common use of a while(true) block like this:

while(true) {
 try {
  wait() 
 } catch (Exception ex) {
   /*do  something*/ 
 }
}

What is the purpose of using while (true) ? Under what kind of scenarios are they particularly useful? Client/Server communications?

Thanks,
- Ivar

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

while(true) is useful if you want to do something all the time while your code is running and you don't know how often you have to do it.

Client/Server Communication is one scenario. Other scenarios are animations of games or keeping some values always up to date.

A Thread is seperated from the other code, so your application would not hang by using while(true).

It is usefull to add an exit-flag to your while(true)-loop, so you can stop it if you want to.

Boolean isExit = false; //set this value to true when needed.
while(true) {
 try {
  if(isExist){
    break;
  }
  wait() 
 } catch (Exception ex) {
   /*do  something*/ 
 }
}
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1  
Catching Exception is a bad idea in general. Even in this case, it is possible that the exception could be something unexpected that it is not appropriate to retry from. Even it is the InterruptedException that you are expecting, squashing it and retrying is a bad idea because it means that the thread won't respond to interrupts. –  Stephen C Jul 21 '11 at 3:02
1  
Yes, that's right Stephen. I just did this for this little example. –  L.Butz Aug 16 '11 at 15:02

This kind of construct is used when we create Thread pools and re-usable threads. Basically the while(true) construct prevents the Threads of the pool to ever exit.

An example would be a Producer-Consumer situation where Threads wait() till until the queue is empty and as soon as the queue has data, they are notify()ied and one of the thread consumes the data from the queue and does the processing and then goes back to wait() for additional data to arrive again.

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This is how you implement a condition variable in Java:

synchronized (this) {
  while (true) {
    try {
      wait();
      if (someCondition) {
        break;
      }
    } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
      // handle the 'interrupt' case ...
    }
  }
  // Do something that depended on the condition being true.
}

The wait call waits until some other thread does a notify on this, presumably to say that the condition is now true. However, it is possible that the condition has become false before the current thread woke up or that multiple threads were woken up. (Obviously, this depends on the application logic of whatever is calling notify or notifyAll.) So we (re-)check the condition and retry if it isn't true. That is the point of the while (true).

The wait() call must be performed inside a monitor lock on this, and the assumption is that this lock is protecting the state that someCondition is checking.

The other tricky thing is dealing with the InterruptedException that may be thrown by wait(). Some people think it is OK to just squash it. In fact, the correct thing to do is to either to propagate it or to call Thread.interrupt() to set the interrupted flag again, and stop whatever the thread is currently doing. If you don't do this, the thread is effectively going to ignore interrupts ... which is a bad thing.


FWIW - catching Exception rather than InteruptedException is bad practice, and possibly a bug.

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The while true causes a infinite loop to stop the thread terminating, for example you don't want your server that is waiting for clients to connect to only check once then to stop checking, you want the server to keep checking over and over. Using a while loop allows you to break; out the loop if something goes wrong.

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This is an infinite loop, thus the thread would wait infinitely until an exception (most likely an InterruptedException) occurs.

That example doesn't make much sense by itself, normally you'd do something after the wait() and then wait for the next notify from another thread. You'd then use while(true) to indefinitely wait for the notification, do some stuff, then wait again until the application throws an exception or some condition to break the loop is met.

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