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I want to create a function that will perform some operation(most time occurring) I created function like following

public void doSth()
{
   //logic
   ClassName.staticMethod();
   //logic
}

In My application there are many times this function will be called. Only the particular line will be change. I decided to give a common function.

Now my question is: How do I pass the ClassName in function arguments so that function body use it dynamically?

Thanks

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My mistake I just came here to format, it was done... – Pedantic Jun 27 '11 at 9:26
    
It's something you should do before you post the question at all. There's the handy How to Format box to the right of the question area, the [?] link above it, and a preview below it so you can check how things will look when posted. – T.J. Crowder Jun 27 '11 at 9:28

You can do that, via Class.forName which accepts a fully-qualified class name and returns a Class instance. Then you have to get the Method for the static method in question via getMethod, and invoke it via invoke.

But passing around class names as strings is a suspect design decision. I'd look at alternatives, such as using singletons rather than static methods and an interface, that sort of thing.

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You'll probably want to pass the class directly, not the its name (otherwise use Class.forName). Then it's just a matter of calling it using reflection:

public void doSth(Class<?> clazz) throws NoSuchMethodException,
        IllegalAccessException, IllegalArgumentException,
        InvocationTargetException {
    Method method = clazz.getMethod("staticMethod");
    if (Modifier.isStatic(method.getModifiers())) {
        Object result = method.invoke(null);
        //do sth with result
    } else {
        // ...
    } 
}
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Seems like a better solution than passing class names around as Strings +1 – Martin McNulty Jun 27 '11 at 10:11

You can use class.forName() method to get an instance of the required class .. see more here

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You could pass two strings, one with class and one with method name. Then you just invoke with Class.forname(classname).getMethod(classname, null).invoke(null, null).

EDIT: This works only if the method is static and has no arguments (else you would replace the nulls with other values).

EDIT: Other Option you got (as mentioned strings for classes and methods are not nice), is to declare an interface and make all Classes with staticMethod implement it (if necessary a wrapper method to call the real static method for the classes, if the staticMethod name is not equal in all classes) and then you just use the interface-Type as parameter.

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I'd recommend you to consider refactoring your code and specify interface as argument type.

You could for instance use a Runnable and the simply do arg.run() instead of ClassName.staticMethod().

Example:

public void doSth(Runnable action) {
    // logic
    action.run();
    // logic
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Downvoter, care to leave a comment? – aioobe Jun 27 '11 at 9:29
    
Runnable is specifically for things to be run on their own threads. From the docs: "The Runnable interface should be implemented by any class whose instances are intended to be executed by a thread." (Not my downvote.) – T.J. Crowder Jun 27 '11 at 9:30
    
It's not just you, someone decided to romp through and downvote all of the answers except mine. Seems a bit harsh to me. – T.J. Crowder Jun 27 '11 at 9:32
    
Sure, in the context of threads etc, Runnable has a specific purpose. It could however be used in other contexts such as this. Besides, it was merely used as an example here, to illustrate the use of an interface as opposed to static methods. – aioobe Jun 27 '11 at 9:59

The more elegant solution would be to use strategy pattern. The code would change to


void f(X x) {
    // some code
    IStrategy strategy = decideStrategy(x);
    strategy.method();
    // rest of the logic
}
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Make use of getcount(),getitem() methods in your adapter to achieve this: Here list is the datasource you are passing to ur adapter,

public int getCount() {
    int count=0;
    for(int i=0;i<list.size();i++)
    {
        if(//ur condition to include the item)
        {
            count++;
        }
    }
    return count;
}

@Override
public Object getItem(int position) {


    if(//ur condition to include the item)
    {
       return list.get(position);

    }
    else
    {
        return null;
    }
}

and in getview()

@Override
public View getView(final int position, View convertView, ViewGroup parent) {
    final LayoutInflater inflater = (LayoutInflater) mContext.getSystemService(Context.LAYOUT_INFLATER_SERVICE);
    convertView = inflater.inflate(R.layout.urlayout, parent, false);



    if(list.get(position)!=null) {


    }

    return convertView;
}
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use java's reflection mechanism

public void someFunction() {

this.getClass().getName();// returns name of class

}

so this way you don't need to pass any arguments

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1  
He has the name of the class, he needs the object (and is not the this class). – flolo Jun 27 '11 at 9:30

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