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During the implementation of the move constructor of a toy class, I noticed a pattern:

array2D(array2D&& that)
{
    data_ = that.data_;
    that.data_ = 0;

    height_ = that.height_;
    that.height_ = 0;

    width_ = that.width_;
    that.width_ = 0;

    size_ = that.size_;
    that.size_ = 0;
}

The pattern obviously being:

    member = that.member;
    that.member = 0;

So I wrote a preprocessor macro to make stealing less verbose and error-prone:

#define STEAL(member) member = that.member; that.member = 0;

Now the implementation looks as following:

array2D(array2D&& that)
{
    STEAL(data_);
    STEAL(height_);
    STEAL(width_);
    STEAL(size_);
}

Are there any downsides to this? Is there a cleaner solution that does not require the preprocessor?

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4  
It's pilfer, not steal. :-) –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jun 27 '11 at 11:50
    
I'm not into C++0x programming yet, but it seems to me that the copying work should be done by constructor, perhaps of a POD state object, then just clear that whole state object or otherwise in some way set zombie or default state for "other"? –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jun 27 '11 at 11:55
    
@Alf: Is that an established term? In that case, I'll consider renaming it. –  FredOverflow Jun 27 '11 at 11:55
1  
@FredOverflow: I don't know about how established, but it's the term that was very often bandied about in early discussions about move semantics. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jun 27 '11 at 11:56
    
I'm pretty sure that "steal" was the term used by the MSVC team. It works. –  Puppy Jun 27 '11 at 11:58
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3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Here is the recommended pattern:

array2D(array2D&& that)
    : data_(std::move(that.data_)),
      height_(std::move(that.height_)),
      width_(std::move(that.width_)),
      size_(std::move(that.size_))
{
    that.data_ = 0;
    that.height_ = 0;
    that.width_ = 0;
    that.size_ = 0;
}

Naturally if the data members are scalar types, the std::move isn't needed. But if you're copying this pattern around, it is helpful to include the move anyway so that when the member data aren't scalar, the std::move doesn't get forgotten.

Also if the member data have actual move constructors, then you can simply omit the body:

array2D(array2D&& that)
    : data_(std::move(that.data_)),
      height_(std::move(that.height_)),
      width_(std::move(that.width_)),
      size_(std::move(that.size_))
{
}

And if you want to generalize to types that don't have move constructors, but do have a resource-less default constructed state, you can:

array2D(array2D&& that)
    : data_(std::move(that.data_)),
      height_(std::move(that.height_)),
      width_(std::move(that.width_)),
      size_(std::move(that.size_))
{
    that.data_ = Data();
    that.height_ = Height();
    that.width_ = Width();
    that.size_ = Size();
}

I recommend ordering these statements in the same order they are declared as data members in the array2D class definition. And I find nothing wrong with the repetition of the initializer list in the body. It is a necessary and second step. There is no need to sweep it under the rug.

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How about using template:

template<typename T> inline
void MOVE(T &dst, T &src)
{
  dst = src;
  src = 0;
}

Usage:

MOVE(data_, that.data_);

@Fred, from your comment, if you want to avoid mentioning data member twice, then:

#define STEAL(X) MOVE(X, that.X)

Usage:

STEAL(data_);
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1  
what about a template <...> inline void MOVE? –  Benoit Jun 27 '11 at 11:53
    
But then I'd have to mention the data member twice... –  FredOverflow Jun 27 '11 at 11:53
    
@FredOverflow, mentioning twice should be ok, because argument name that might be renamed in future. I have edited the answer though for that case also. –  iammilind Jun 27 '11 at 11:57
    
Naming a macro _MOVE is not a good idea, because identifiers starting with an underscore followed by an upper-case letter are reserved for the implementation. –  FredOverflow Jun 27 '11 at 12:01
1  
Naming a function MOVE is a bad idea because identifiers in all-uppercase are commonly used for macros. Just name the macro MOVE() and the function move(). –  MSalters Jun 27 '11 at 13:01
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Initialize your own members to default, and then swap.

array2D(array2D&& that)
{
    data_ = 0;    
    height_ = 0;    
    width_ = 0;    
    size_ = 0;

    this->swap(that);
}

Even cleaner (if your compiler supports it)

array2D(array2D&& that)
: array2D() {
    this->swap(that);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I thought about that, but wouldn't it be sort of inefficient? –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jun 27 '11 at 11:57
    
This won't work without a specialized swap because the C++0x std::swap moves things around, leading to an infinite recursion... –  JohannesD Jun 27 '11 at 11:58
3  
@Alf: The compiler can easily handle this. @Johannes: I explicitly called a member function, not std::swap. Offering a swap operation is the best way to do many semantics, including copying, so it's not unreasonable to expect one to have been provided- even move-only classes are swappable. –  Puppy Jun 27 '11 at 11:58
    
If you do this, why not delegating to the default constructor? –  sbi Jun 27 '11 at 12:01
1  
@DeadMG: following @JohannesD remark --> to be clear, in C++0x, you should implement either the move constructor OR the swap fully, and you can write the other in term of the one you implemented (unless you'd rather do the work twice...). Although, I do wonder, it seems somewhat best handled by having "automatic" resources. –  Matthieu M. Jun 27 '11 at 13:32
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