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I am writing a basic jQuery form validation script and I have something like this going on: (Please note, I have simplified the validation criteria since it is not the problem here.)

$('#contact-form').submit( function (event) {
    event.preventDefault();

    var name = $(this).find('input[type="text"]').val();
    var message = $(this).find('textarea').val();

    //  Validation
    if (name.length <= 3 || message.length <= 3) {
        $(this).after('<span>Error<span>');
    }
}); 

What I wnat to do is somhow make jQuery recognize the corect this where the error has ocured from the

if (name.length <= 3 || message.length <= 3) {
   $(this).after('<span class="error">Error<span>');
}

statement and insert the error span after it. What I currently have inserts the error message only after the first input, not the input that had a mistake.

I know how to do it if I separate each element validation in its own if statement, but I think that would be unnecessary repetition.

Also please don't suggest any validation plugins, I am aware of those, but I want to learn to do this on my own.

Thank you.

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Given that you're not doing this on your own, you're asking us....why not look at one of the plugins you are aware of to see how they do it? –  Jamie Dixon Jun 27 '11 at 12:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This in jquery refers to the element that generated the event: in your case $(this) refers to the element with id = 'contact.form'.

You could do something like this:

$('#contact-form').submit( function (event) {
    event.preventDefault();

    $('input[type=text],textarea').each(function(){
          //in this case this refers to the current iterated object
          var value = $(this).val();
          if (value.length < 3){
              $(this).after('<span>Error - too short<span>');
          }

    });

}); 
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1  
One minor correction. In the top-level context, this refers to the element with id = 'contact-form'. The token $(this) is actually saying invoke the $() function with a parameter of this, and does not actually "refer" to anything itself. It returns a jQuery wrapped version of the node. But since you are in a context where this already points to a jQuery wrapped element calling $(this) is idempotent and can be omitted. You can work directly with this and get exactly the same result. –  aroth Jun 27 '11 at 12:52
    
Thanks for the clarification! :) –  Nicola Peluchetti Jun 27 '11 at 12:56
1  
the second param in the each selection is supposed to be a context, you should be doing $('input[type=text]', this) instead of $('input[type=text]', 'textarea') –  RobertPitt Jun 27 '11 at 12:58
    
Sorry i mistyped , i wanted to say all input of type text and all textareas (api.jquery.com/multiple-selector) –  Nicola Peluchetti Jun 27 '11 at 13:03
    
I think this is what I need, I just use add() to combine multiple selectors. Thanks. –  Maverick Jun 27 '11 at 13:10

The way that most of the plugins do this is to use a class which describes the validation rule for each input for example <input name="name" value="" class="val-required val-string"> could tell the script that the field is required and that it must contain a string.

You can then use something like $('form input').each( function(n) { // code here }); this way $(this) will refer to the input field in question at each iteration of the loop.

Hope that helps

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Perhaps something like:

$('#contact-form').submit( function (event) {
    event.preventDefault();

    jQuery.each($(this).find('input[type="text"]'), function() {
        var fieldVal = $(this).value;
        if (fieldVal.length <= 3) {
            $(this).after('<span>Error<span>');
        }
    });   

    jQuery.each($(this).find('textarea'), function() {
        var fieldVal = $(this).value;
        if (fieldVal.length <= 3) {
            $(this).after('<span>Error<span>');
        }
    });   
}); 

Basically, you need to use each() to iterate over the elements you are validating. This will invoke the function that you provide each() once for each element that you pass. Each function invocation will have this set to the current element being iterated.

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